Keep your garden growing - see what to plant right now

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Showing 1 - 30 of 247 comments
Watermelon 26 Jul, Mariam (USA - Zone 9b climate)
I stay near Orlando. I planted some watermelon seeds in a pot inside my house few days ago. Now 2 of them are growing in the pot. Then I don't know should I take the pot out and put it in the yard or keep it at home to grow. Also the pot is small, should I take the baby plants out and plant them in the yard? Thanks for your help.
Chilli peppers (also Hot peppers) 17 Jul, Eric Nelson (Australia - tropical climate)
I'm actually in Thailand but your site doesn't list that. Having a hard time growing chilies here and looking for any hints. Soil has plenty of nutrients but does not dry out due to the rains and clay underlayer. At this point I'm thinking of adding sand to the soil to aid in drainage. I've dug a hole in the garden down to the clay layer and filled it with water. It drained within 5 minutes so it's really about my topsoil quality. Thanks!
Collards (also Collard greens, Borekale) 14 Jul, Kathy (USA - Zone 6b climate)
I did not start my collard, cabbage, seed in March - can I plant the seeds in the garden now in mid-July? Also, can I plant cauliflower in the garden from seed in July? I live in zone 6b. Thanks!!!
Basil 09 Jul, Jayne (USA - Zone 11a climate)
Hi, I'm in Zone 11a and need some clarification. For example regarding Basil, when you state 'P - Plant In The Garden' are you meaning plant seeds in seed trays in these months or to plant out young plants (that were seed sown in trays 4-6 wks earlier) in these months? Hope that question makes sense! Thanks. (P-Plant in garden means plant into the ground unless your local weather is not suitable - in which case, start basil in a seed tray and transfer later. - Liz)
Asparagus 01 Jul, Michael (USA - Zone 5a climate)
Is asparagus perennial or annual
Asparagus 06 Jul, John (Australia - temperate climate)
Asparagus is perennial and will bear for around 20 years.
Florence Fennel (also Finocchio) 25 Jun, Jay (USA - Zone 5a climate)
Can I plant fennels at 8500 feet high Colorado
Horseradish 17 Jun, Glenn Dahlem (USA - Zone 10b climate)
Are places unusually hot in summer, such as Phoenix, AZ area, too hot for horseradish to grow, assuming it's being watered throughout the summer months?
Zucchini (also Courgette/Marrow, Summer squash) 16 Jun, Delores Victory (USA - Zone 5a climate)
When is the last month to grow zucchini?
Sweet corn (also maize) 12 Jun, (USA - Zone 5a climate)
In order to have a later harvest when is the last date in my time zone that I can plant sweet corn. We already have first planting in.
Carrot 11 Jun, BARBARA ADAMS TAYLOR (USA - Zone 6a climate)
Is it too late to plant carrots in zone 6a on the 11th of June? Thank you
Yam/Oka (also Oca) 05 Jun, pati (USA - Zone 5a climate)
will these grow in Michigan
Yam/Oka (also Oca) 09 Jun, John (Australia - temperate climate)
Yams/oka need about 5 months to grow before harvesting. They can be planted when the soil reaches about 17 degrees C (a bit over 60 degrees). if you can fit these requirements you should be right. Harvest them after the leaves have started to die down to give them the most opportunity to make size.
Pumpkin 09 May, Beverly (USA - Zone 7b climate)
In a large garden plot how far apart should potatoes and pumpkins be planted?
Pumpkin 10 May, John (Australia - tropical climate)
The only real consideration is to allow the pumpkins to spread if they are the 'running' type. Bush pumpkins can grow to about six feet across and you would need a bit of space to work around them. potatoes could be planted about a foot apart. The limit there is more on the available nutrients in the soil and management of the plants. Trust this helps.
Cucumber 02 May, Janice Cranford (USA - Zone 9a climate)
Why are my cucumber plants not making a cucumber, only flowers?
Cucumber 03 May, John (Australia - temperate climate)
Cucumbers often produce male flowers early in the season before they start to produce female (cucumber) flowers. The male flowers have a longer stem and do not have the unformed cucumber at the base of the flower. I'd say, give them a bit more time.
Cape Gooseberry (also Golden Berry, Inca Berry ) 02 May, Elizabeth Medgyesy (USA - Zone 5a climate)
My two year old Cape Gooseberry plants have big strong shoots that have tiny plants along them. I'd like to cut them and transplant them to get more of this delicious berry. Any suggestions on how and where to cut the plant and then transplant the best way?
Tomato 01 May, Jack Zampella (USA - Zone 6b climate)
I am hoping that you will be able to answer this question for me. I have raised beds that I vegetable garden in. Everything I have read over the past 10 years says that 2 inches of compost should be added to the beds yearly which I have done. I fertilize with organic fertilizers. My question is I no longer have room for additional compost in the beds. Should I remove some of the "great" soil from the beds to add additional compost or wait until the compost decomposes to add more( this usually takes about 2 years) Thank you in advance for your help. Jack Zampella
Tomato 02 May, John (Australia - temperate climate)
If you have been adding 2" of compost every year for a number of years I would think your soil is quite fertile. You could, as you suggest, take some off. I would not add any this year, instead I would give the garden bed a dressing of garden or agricultural lime. The continual adding of compost to the soil is great for building up the soil but if there is a lot of organic matter still breaking down you would be safe to leave it for a season. The addition of lime will reduce the acidity and allow the release of a lot of nutrients currently there. Organic matter over time, while enriching the soil, will increase the acidity (lower the pH) and make nutrients less available. Lime reverses this. All the best.
Tomato 08 May, Jack Zampella (USA - Zone 6b climate)
John (Australia) thanks for your response. That was going to be my course of action. You just confirmed it. Again thank you for your input.
Choko/Chayote (also Chayote squash, christophene, chouchou, mirliton) 29 Apr, danny (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
what causes the the leaves to go powder like and kills the vine on the choko
Choko/Chayote (also Chayote squash, christophene, chouchou, mirliton) 30 Apr, Jack (Australia - temperate climate)
The white powdery coating on the leaves of your choko is an indicator of powdery mildew. This fungus affects many crops in late summer and autumn. Chokos, pumpkins, zucchinis and cucumber being some of the worst affected. Good air circulation and watering at the root rather than overhead is good insurance against this problem. I know of people who make a spray of 10% milk in water as an effective control. Alternatively you could spray the plant with a fungicide spray.
Basil 27 Apr, Monique (USA - Zone 9a climate)
Ok,, I live in zone 9A and I'm trying to grown basil. No matter where or how I try to grow it it dies. Looks like it's getting burnt when I plant it outside. How much should I water it or how often ???? HELP !
Basil 28 Apr, John (Australia - temperate climate)
Basil is normally easy to grow. Normally you would plant it in your area from April to July.It doesn't like frost but, as it is a soft herb it doesn't like extreme heat and drying winds either. Try planting it where it gets morning sun and is protected from harsh conditions. A spot that gets light shade would also be good. Basil likes fertile, well drained soil and will reward you if the water supply is evenly damp but not wet. Sowing seed directly where it is going to grow is the best as direct-seeded plants will always do better than transplants. Trust this helps.
Basil 25 Apr, Monique (USA - Zone 5a climate)
I live in Florida around Daytona beach and can't grow basil to save my life. I've tried it in pots inside and outside. This year O planted it by my tomatoes and it still died. I'm I watering it to much too much sunny it said full sun but it looks like it's getting brunt... HELP !!
Basil 30 Apr, John (Australia - temperate climate)
Basil is normally easy to grow. it likes moist, fertile soil and, while it won't tolerate frosts, it will burn with heat or drying winds. Select a spot that gets morning sun and protection later in the day then sow seed thinly in this spot. Sowing seed direct is more successful than using a seed bed or pot then transplanting as the plants aren't subject to root disturbance and transplanting shock.
Asparagus 22 Apr, Joy (New Zealand - cool/mountain climate)
Can you tell the difference between male and female asparagus, and what is the difference?
Asparagus 23 Apr, Jack (USA - Zone 6b climate)
When the tops are allowed to develop into the feathery stage the female plants will have the berries which turn red when ripe.
Rutabaga (also Swedes) 21 Apr, Brian Hargiss (USA - Zone 7a climate)
Where and when is the best place to plant rutabagas in northwest Arkansas? Thank you very much
Showing 1 - 30 of 247 comments
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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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