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Growing Squash, also Crookneck, Pattypan, Summer squash

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
      P P P P P        

(Best months for growing Squash in Australia - tropical regions)

P = Sow seed

  • Grow in seed trays, and plant out in 4-6 weeks. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 21°C and 35°C. (Show °F/in)
  • Space plants: 60 - 80 cm apart
  • Harvest in 7-8 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Sweet corn
  • Mother Hubbard squash
    Mother Hubbard squash
  • Pattypan squash
    Pattypan squash

Start in individual pots then transfer when all risk of frost is past. For succession, later plantings can be straight into the ground. Fast maturing squash varieties for summer growing. Not suitable to store like pumpkins. Usually grown to pick when young and used without removing rind or seeds.

Zucchini/courgette (see under Z) is also a variety of squash

Protect from frost. Water well. Grow on well mulched, raised area. Shelter from strong winds.

A spray with a 5gm/teasp Bicarbonate of Soda in 600ml/pint of water will help slow powdery mildew when it appears.

Culinary hints - cooking and eating Squash

Use whole or sliced. Steam or fry.

Your comments and tips

04 Dec 16, Mark (Australia - temperate climate)
My wife is Asian and she says it is ok to eat the plant itself. I know you can eat the flowers but I'm not so sure about the plant. Is it toxic or safe to eat?
17 Feb 17, Chris (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
You can eat pumpkin shoots and they are essentially the same plant, so I would think it's safe enough
18 Nov 16, warren white (Australia - temperate climate)
I've been eating my squash strait off the plant uncooked, thinly sliced on a vegemite sandwich. you really should try this!
11 May 16, KT (Australia - arid climate)
Can I grow spaghetti squash in Perth and where can I get some seeds please?
16 May 16, Bianca (Australia - temperate climate)
Join Share the Seed Australia or WA Seed Exchange on Facebook and ask on there. You will need to get them from someone already in WA because of our quarantine laws :)
20 Oct 15, Chau (Australia - temperate climate)
Hi The squash is dropping off before it is fully grown. What might be the issue.. Thanks Chau
24 Oct 15, (Australia - temperate climate)
The fruit comes from the female flower and it needs to be pollinated by a male flower (much like people) for it to develop into a fruit that is then able to produce seeds and reproduce a new plant. check google for male/female flowers on squash, same applies for pumpkin, zucchini and cucumbers etc. early in the season the plant may not have both sets of flowers but as the plant develops it will. you can also hand pollinate. hope that helps.
10 Aug 15, barry hughes (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
what varieties of squash can be planted now in the brisbane region?
16 Jun 12, Monette (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
had some squash plants spring up in my garden (from compost maybe) plants grew beautifully had several male flowers but only a few female ones and never. is there any thing I need to do to get the plants to bear fruit
18 Jun 12, Erin (New Zealand - sub-tropical climate)
Some squash need to be hand polinated, just google "hand pollinating squash." There are youtube vids that would explain better than I could in text alone. It's pretty easy, and it has worked for me.
Showing 1 - 10 of 32 comments

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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