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Growing Daikon, also Japanese radish, Lo Bok

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
      P P P P          

(Best months for growing Daikon in Australia - tropical regions)

P = Sow seed

  • Easy to grow. Direct in garden. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 10°C and 20°C. (Show °F/in)
  • Space plants: 15 cm apart
  • Harvest in 8-10 weeks. Dig daikon carefully. They are rather brittle..
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Chervil, cress,lettuce, leeks, spinach, strawberries, tomatoes
  • Avoid growing close to: Gherkins, hyssop
  • Mature daikon
    Mature daikon

A long white radish, milder flavour than the small round or oval radishes. Most varieties of Daikon prefer cooler weather. Have a tendency to 'bolt' or flower early in warm/hot weather. Choose a variety to suit your climate. Grow in deep soil and water regularly. They will grow as big as large parsnips if left but the best flavour seems to be when they are about the size of a carrot.

Can be stored in the refrigerator for a couple of weeks if washed and dried and the leaves cut off.

A range of varieties of Daikon is available, some will do better in warm areas.

Culinary hints - cooking and eating Daikon

Daikon radish can be eaten simmered, stir fried, grated, pickled or baked. Its leaves are also edible and can be used in recipes that call for turnip greens, and its seeds make sprouts to eat in salads or in sandwiches.

Your comments and tips

22 Jun 16, Ray Smith (United Kingdom - warm/temperate climate)
If the radish bolt and flower what's next pull the Radish up.
27 Feb 16, Amy (Australia - temperate climate)
I'm in Melbourne and I bought daikon seeds from Ceres in Brunswick East.
09 Oct 15, Aussie Bob (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Planted these in early May on the sunshine coast and got several large (15 cm diameter 40 cm long) radishes harvested in October. They seem to be very susceptible to tight soil i that will cause them to stunt as the ones in the bed with looser soil were much larger. Good sun exposure is a must or they will reach for the sun and grow twisted.
14 Oct 14, Jenny (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
I too have planted daikon which have grown about a metre high and flowered but the radishes are only about 5 cm long and 1cm wide. Should I prune the leaves?
01 Oct 14, Lerna Obaldo (Australia - temperate climate)
I planted daikon radish but the plants flowered. I have not harvested any. Someone said that the seeds I used are not pure. It is a DT Brown packet.
02 Aug 14, Urmila Sriskanda (Australia - temperate climate)
I tried growing daikon from seed during winter but it did not grow. Would you plant the seeds into a seedling tray first or into the soil?
12 Aug 14, Chris (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
Daikon don't transplant well, but you could grow them in seed tubes so they can be transplanted without any disturbance. The ground might have been too cold for them to germinate over winter. They are often planted in summer/autumn in cold regions.
30 Nov 13, Rick (USA - Zone 4a climate)
What causes the black ring I smetimes get in my daikon?
05 Mar 13, gary bailey (Australia - arid climate)
i tried to locates seeds, but no luck. can you provide me address.
01 Mar 16, Julie (Australia - temperate climate)
Just a hint if your looking for Daikon seeds. I purchased a pack under the name Daikon in Bunnings with about 20 seeds in it, it was marketed as an exotic species and so the price was high. But if you look for 'white radish' seeds (check the botanical name is exactly the same as the ones labled 'Daikon') you can get 5 times the amount of seeds for half the price.
Showing 1 - 10 of 20 comments

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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