Keep your garden growing - see what to plant right now

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Showing 31 - 60 of 264 comments
Asparagus 09 Oct, Ali Mofazali (USA - Zone 8b climate)
What is the best way to grow asparagus in Georgia USA?
Asparagus 15 Jan, Debbie Schwitzer (USA - Zone 7a climate)
I planted 3 yr old crowns that I bought online ( have done this in two homes in same county) and they have come up sparsely every year. They have spread slightly and most of the spears have gotten smaller in diameter. I believe I did not pick the best site for them so I am digging them up this month and replanting them next month in better area. Since they do grow consistently every year with little to no care where they are, I figure a better site would have them producing at least enough for one meal for 2 people!
Tomato 15 Oct, jeffrey (USA - Zone 5a climate)
found a great calendar all about tomato it is from the butte county Master Gardener program they have a great calendar out all about tomato i picked one up last week at an event you should check it out
Artichokes (Globe) 22 Oct, Joe Agostinacchio (USA - Zone 5a climate)
I planted artichokes for the first time this summer. I live on Long Island, N.Y., how do I protect the plants from the coming winter? Do I trim back the leaves that are there now, or let them stay?
Artichokes (Globe) 27 Jan, Romel Madray (USA - Zone 10a climate)
Try mulching them with grass on top. I would suggest cutting them back and muchine them with saw dust or grass. Regards
Asparagus Pea (also Winged bean) 27 Oct, indra prasad (USA - Zone 8a climate)
where in sacramento can I find Asparagus pea ?
Asparagus Pea (also Winged bean) 04 Jul, Bim (USA - Zone 10a climate)
Am in SF. Bought my seeds at kitazawaseed.com. They are in Oakland CA.
Garlic 06 Nov, Marlene Allen (USA - Zone 8b climate)
I am trying to find a garlic farm that could supply a larage grocery store. I went to my Krogers store in WIllis , Texas and their garlic was from China. Thank you for your service
Sweet Potato (also Kumara) 18 Nov, graham (USA - Zone 5a climate)
I would like to try to grow kumara potatoes in our green house as you say they need a long growing season. Can you advise me where I can buy tubers/seeds? Many thanks Graham
Choko/Chayote (also Chayote squash, christophene, chouchou, mirliton) 19 Dec, TRUDY (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Hi Can anyone give me a recipe for choko pie as a desert. I have chokos growing madly on my vine and i am trying to think of different way to cook these great veges. Thanks Trudy
Choko/Chayote (also Chayote squash, christophene, chouchou, mirliton) 29 Mar, Catherine (Australia - temperate climate)
Hi Trudy, Yes the much maligned Choko. I love the look of the plant, it's lush, no effort gardening AND you get fruit. I have it growing over up to the top storey of a inner city terrace. It screens the street off and makes for a very Mediterranean like view from my window. The only maintenance is the occasional clip to stop it 'decorating' the neighbours terrace as well. I have the same abundance of crop - try this one: Choko Chocolate Cake. Doesn't use many chokos but you can shock your guests after all the ohh and ahhing but revealing what the secret ingredient is. The choko gives it a fibre texture a bit like banana bread it makes for a very yummy cake. I can't post the website here but in the recipes section of the website 'Successful Gardening with Annette McFarlane', is the Chocolate Cake recipe along with others for Chokos. They also have other unusual fruit too - I can also recommend the LillyPilly Jam! Have fun. :) Cat
Choko/Chayote (also Chayote squash, christophene, chouchou, mirliton) 21 Apr, Sandra (Australia - temperate climate)
Hi Catherine, thanks for the tip re the choko chocolate cake. I have had a look at it and noticed sugar is mentioned twice ie 1 1/2 cups and then later 1 cup. Is this a miss print? it just seems like a lot of sugar for 125g of butter. cheers, Sandra
Sweet Potato (also Kumara) 02 Jan, Lisa Baird (USA - Zone 6a climate)
I also long for NZ Kumara, and have been unable to find them in the states. Where can I order tubers for growing or for eating? I'll start a greenhouse if needed. Thank you.
Yacon (also Sunroot) 05 Jan, Jackie C (USA - Zone 8b climate)
Do you have info. about who sells plant or fruit to grow?.. (So. Florida)
Yacon (also Sunroot) 28 Apr, Chris (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
Nichols Garden Nursery in Albany, OR has Yacon. They sell via the web.
Yacon (also Sunroot) 14 Jun, Jakes (South Africa - Dry summer sub-tropical climate)
Looking for Yacon tubers.
Peas 05 Feb, PAUL (USA - Zone 5a climate)
Can snap peas be started in fiber pots indooors now FEB., then moved outdoors in March?
Broccoli 09 Feb, Lee-Ann Connolly (USA - Zone 8a climate)
Hello When you say PLANT in garden is that the seed to plant in the garden where they going to grow or seedlings ? Many Thanks Lee-Ann
Broccoli 10 Feb, Stephanie (Australia - arid climate)
Thanks I was wondering the same thing. Also if it says plant in garden, but you cant yet because you are waiting for, say, your tomatos to finish, should you plant in seed trays instead?
Broccoli 11 Feb, peter (Australia - temperate climate)
if you look at the planting 'timetable' it indicates sowing seed in Feb and PLANTING out seedlings 4-6 weeks later. So, yes I'd be getting seeds into trays now ready to plant out when your tommys finish =)
Collards (also Collard greens, Borekale) 01 Mar, Debra (USA - Zone 8a climate)
My collards are starting to grow what looks like seed pods at the top of the plant. How do I harvest the seeds?
Collards (also Collard greens, Borekale) 04 Mar, Larry Smith (USA - Zone 8b climate)
I think they are bolting (going to seed). All the energy is going into stalk and producing seeds. I think they are done when this happens.
Daikon (also Japanese radish, Lo Bok) 11 Mar, Karen Lovadina (USA - Zone 5b climate)
I live in St. Louis , MO. and I planted Daikon directly seeded last October, 2011. I think it was a winter variety but, I'm not sure. Anyway, it lasted all through the winter, which was mild, and now the leasves are about 5 - 6 inches long and the plants are extremely close together. Should I thin them out or will they push each other out? The daikon is only a sliver, literally only as thick as a quarter of a pencil. Thanks for any info you can give me. Karen
Daikon (also Japanese radish, Lo Bok) 17 Mar, mark (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Do you still grow daikon radishes and how did they turn out? I live in Kansas City, MO and I was thinking about growing them to eat and improve my soil. Thanks!
Pak Choy (also Pak choi) 12 Mar, houston (USA - Zone 7a climate)
please explain thinning and what happens if its not done
Parsley (also curly leaf parsley or flat leaf (Italian) parsley) 15 Mar, Annymus (USA - Zone 10a climate)
Parsley grows really well in the US (west Coast). It's a little difficult to start from seed but once it starts producing, it is wonderful. After cutting it down (harvesting the leaves), it just grows back again. It just keeps growing until it freezes in the winter. I grow moss curled parsley.
Basil 15 Mar, Anonymus (USA - Zone 10a climate)
I have had no problem seeding basil indoors. They come up easily. My plants grow fine. But after I pinch of all the god leaves, it produces a little more then stoppes producing altgether. What did I do wrong? Everone says to just keep pinching to help encourage new growth. That doesn't work for me. The plant just dies before producing god regrwth.
Basil 20 Aug, (USA - Zone 9b climate)
I had the same problem at first. Most instructions aren't very clear on the details. The trick is to wait until there are 3-5 sets of true leaves on the seedling. Then, only cut off the top pair of leaves. Also don't pinch or trim until it is transplanted or in its final pot for growing. For the second "pinch," wait until the suckers (like on tomatoes) have 2-3 new sets of leaves, at least. Always use scissors or shears, btw. A good rule of thumb is to never remove more than 1/3 of a plant's leaves at a time, if you want it to keep growing. Once I figured out how to trim my basil plants, they went nuts within a couple of months. Now I have more basil than I can handle!
Basil 20 Aug, (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Don't pinch or cut the leaves off. Instead use scissors to cut the *stem* just below the pair of leaves you intend to harvest. Then, in the kitchen, pick the leaves off the stem while washing them.
Basil 30 Mar, Steve Lohn (USA - Zone 9b climate)
The only reason you should pinch basil is if it starts to get leggy. Let it grow and take the top leaves for your recipes. I plant lots of it and let it go to seed. The seeds restart themselves in the same pot.
Showing 31 - 60 of 264 comments
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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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