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Growing Sage, also Common Sage

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
      P                

(Best months for growing Sage in USA - Zone 5a regions)

P = Sow seed

  • Sow in garden. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 50°F and 77°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 20 inches apart
  • Harvest in approximately 18 months. Time reduced if grown from cuttings.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Broccoli, Cauliflower, Rosemary, Cabbage and Carrots
  • Common sage
  • Sage flowers

Sage grows well from seeds but it is slow developing.

One plant will usually be enough for the average household.

A plant grown from a cutting will be ready to use in about 3 months.

Stake or protect from strong winds, otherwise the plant may snap off the main stem.

Sage will grow almost anywhere as long as it is in full sun for most of the day. Sage does not like soil that is moist all the time - Avoid frequent watering even in the middle of the summer.

Culinary hints - cooking and eating Sage

The leaves are used to flavour stuffing and meat dishes.
Sage keeps well if dried.

Your comments and tips

15 May 18, Elaine (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
Great site but it needs a search bar for plants. Is the planting season the same for Clary Sage (Salvia sclarera)?
15 May 18, Liz (New Zealand - temperate climate)
If you click on the 'Vegetables and Herbs' tab - top right, home page - you can search for vegetables.
26 Apr 18, Sal (New Zealand - cool/mountain climate)
pinch the flowers if you want to foster increased leaf production.
12 Oct 18, Rose (Australia - temperate climate)
I pick my flowers off every year, and 4yr old shrubs are now 1m round balls of deliciously scented leaves
26 Apr 18, Gail (Australia - temperate climate)
Howdy im working towards being a white sage grower in South Australia, if you're interested in being apart of my journey, feel free to email me. Cheers.
29 Nov 17, Maz (New Zealand - temperate climate)
Hi working in a nursery and having trouble with sage cuttings dying. In the last few weeks most of the sage cuttings die - the cuttings are done early in morning with rooting powder then placed on a misting table until roots form. Over winter no issues but the warmer weather has created havoc. Any suggestions - should they not be put on a misting table where they get sprayed throughout the day? Thanks in advance. Maz
13 Aug 16, Meg (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
I live in temperate climate but we have had quite a chilly winter and spring with some frosts, so I chose cool/mountain to reflect local conditions at the moment. I live in the hills outside Melbourne. My white sage looks sick - nothing like when I first bought it - with its top leaves and stem drooping and some pale brown patches appearing on the leaves. It's still in its pot - was advised best not to plant out until warmer weather. I've kept it in a sheltered position and well-drained but its looking sicker by the day. I would be very grateful for some advice, thankyou.
24 Jun 17, Janine A Young (Australia - temperate climate)
It sounds like it may be over-watered to me. Sage prefers to dry out between deep waterings. In Winter a weekly water would be the most frequent I would attempt; but a better indication of when to water is when a fingertip inserted into the soil finds it dry to the depth of 1inch.
14 Dec 15, derek (South Africa - Dry summer sub-tropical climate)
Is sage compatible to grow with thyme, rosemary and basil in the same pot or I am using a old wheel borrow.
02 Apr 15, Bongi (South Africa - Humid sub-tropical climate)
where will I get seeds for sage
Showing 1 - 10 of 33 comments

I have two sage plants growing near each other - currently only about 4 inches tall. On one plant only, the leaves seem to be being eaten by something which leaves a 'lace' type pattern on the leaves i.e. its not eating the leaf in its entirety, almost just nibbling away at the leaf between the veins, from the centre of the leaf outwards which leaves behind a 'lace' effect - quite unusual to see. Any feedback on what this is? how to treat? is it likely to spread to be non effected plant?

- Cass

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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