Growing Rosemary

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
      S T              

(Best months for growing Rosemary in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays T = Plant out (transplant) seedlings

  • Easy to grow. Plant cuttings . Best planted at soil temperatures between 15°C and 20°C. (Show °F/in)
  • Space plants: 100 - 150 cm apart
  • Harvest in approximately 1 years. In warmer areas, harvest time might be shorter.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Beans, Carrots, Cabbages, Sage
  • Avoid growing close to: Potatoes
  • Prostrate Rosemary

Rosemary will grow from seeds but this is not recommended as the success rate is very low. Small cuttings are easy to grow. Put in light, sandy soil where you want your plant to grow or start in small pots and plant out when established.

Rosemary comes from warm Mediterranean areas but adapts well to colder climates. In areas of heavy frost, a cutting potted up and kept in a sheltered spot will insure against total loss of your plant over winter.

Dryness suits rosemary, so well-drained soil and sunshine will be best.

Once established rosemary can be harvested all year round.

Rosemary grows well in patio pots or tubs.

Culinary hints - cooking and eating Rosemary

Leaves sprinkled on roast potatoes, meat and barbeque food make them extra tasty.

Rosemary can also be used to add flavour to vinegars and oils.

Your comments and tips

03 Jan 21, Linda Arencibia (USA - Zone 7a climate)
I bought four rosemary plants of substantial size yesterday, ( January 2nd). I live in Virginia in zone 7a. I wonder if I can plant these outside now or if I should wait until Spring. I keep my house at about 70 degrees and do not have any truly sunny rooms. The best and most consistent daylight comes from a patio door on the West side of the house.
05 Jan 21, E (USA - Zone 7a climate)
You need to judge by how cold it is in your area - frosts etc. Be guided by what it says here about doing cuttings if a lot of frosts. Maybe leave planting out until after the last frost. Plants need sunlight. Maybe put them out in the day and bring in at night if going to be really cold.
23 Dec 20, Alyssa (USA - Zone 8a climate)
My family and I have been trying to grow rosemary for a few years but we can't seem to get them through the winter. We know they can grow well here as there are plenty outside the shops around town but ours can't seem to survive long enough to get established. We tried wintering them in the garage this year as we have cats and can't keep them inside the house itself but it didn't seem to make a difference. Is there a variety that's better suited to my zone that might have a better chance, or are there any tips that might help me keep these plants going?
28 Dec 20, colleen (USA - Zone 10b climate)
Is it possible they're getting too much water and/or your soil doesn't drain quickly enough? Rosemary is pretty tough and drought tolerant but it doesn't like being soggy too long, especially in cooler weather. Try adding more grit to the soil so the rosemary can dry out between waterings. You might also ask one of those shops if you can take a few cuttings from their plants, as rosemary is pretty easy to propagate from cuttings, and that way you'd know you have a variety that does well locally. They should be happy to let you, as rosemary needs to be pruned regularly anyway.
24 Dec 20, Anonymous (USA - Zone 9a climate)
Read the notes here, there are several tips to follow. Like do not overwater them especially in winter, they are a bit of a tough hardy plant, so don't water as much as some other plants. Have good free draining soil not heavy clay soil. They like sunshine so don't put in a garage, most plants need heaps of sunlight. And if you have lots of frost best to do a few cuttings for the next year.
12 May 20, Bradley Swan (Australia - temperate climate)
When is the best time to prune a Rosemary bush in Australia.
13 May 20, Anonymous (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Probably anytime of the year but more so when it is in a growing stage. The gardens I go to, it is a hedge so it is trimmed often.
17 Feb 20, Thomas Norris (USA - Zone 9b climate)
I am in zone 9b. Will rosemary survive all day, 10+ hours of summer sun?
08 Mar 20, Patricia Foster (USA - Zone 9b climate)
We have rosemary planted in the ground. We have had it in full sun as well as in partial shade - it thrives either way. Rosemary will get to be at least three feet tall and may create 3-4 foot diameter bunches so be sure to give it some space.
24 Feb 20, Gracie (USA - Zone 9b climate)
I live in zone 9b, and I have one Rosemary in a container growing nicely. It is a hassle-free herb. I have it outside in a full sun area. I just make sure it gets its water. I also have Basil, this is in partial sun area. It is also a hassle-free herb. Just protect them from bugs.
Showing 1 - 10 of 39 comments

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