Growing Radish

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    P P P     P        

(Best months for growing Radish in USA - Zone 5a regions)

P = Sow seed

  • Easy to grow. Sow in garden. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 46°F and 86°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 1 - 2 inches apart
  • Harvest in 5-7 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Chervil, cress,lettuce, leeks, spinach, strawberries, tomatoes
  • Avoid growing close to: Hyssop, gherkins
  • Cherry radish
  • French Breakfast radishes

Small, spicy tasting root vegetable usually round but some longer varieties . Available in a range of colours between red and white.

Very easy to grow. Good for a child's first garden as seedlings appear in two or three days. Sow between other vegetables as they will mark the rows until the slower germinating plants appear.

Culinary hints - cooking and eating Radish

Wash well and remove leaves and roots.
Use raw in salads or on their own with bread and butter.

Your comments and tips

24 Nov 20, Sarah Browne (South Africa - Semi-arid climate)
Someone is eating my radish leaves. Tiny pinprick holes. Any advice?
25 Sep 20, Dennis Naidoo (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
Hi I planted bell peppers tomatoes and brinjals They are flowering and some peppers and tomatoes are showing some fruit. What fertlizer can i use to increase fruit Dennis
05 Oct 20, Nick Baxendale (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
Hi Dennis, I use borax, dilute one tablespoon in four litres of water and spray plants when they start to flower, worked like a bomb on my brinjal plants, they also like calcium, take egg shells wash them and then crush into jar of water let stand for a couple of days them treat brinjal plants by pouring water into soil. Please don't forget to wash shells first otherwise you will have a hell of a stink, like my first time. Cheers Nick
27 Sep 20, (South Africa - Semi-arid climate)
A general fertiliser will do. If you start with good rich soil then you really don't need to fertilise again.
31 Aug 20, Kishinchand Chellaram (Australia - temperate climate)
HI, I planet white radish , the laves where the green leaves where long and well but the radish was very thin like a stick very thin . so what is the reason? thanks
03 Sep 20, Anonymous (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
I have grown Daiken and White Hailstone radishes the last couple of years and find they have a far bigger leaf top. As mentioned too much nitrogen probably. In the tropics and sub tropics more a autumn winter crop. Too much shade and they will not grow very well. A picket fence (on the north side of the garden) shading my radishes is enough to stop them from producing a crop.
01 Sep 20, Jon Hosford (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
Radishes typically grow a long thin root with healthy leaves before filling out as the plant matures at about 6 weeks. There could be a number of reasons as to why your plants didn't mature: the soil was over rich in nitrogen fertilizer ( radishes prefer a modestly fertilised soil ); you may not have let them mature long enough before harvesting. Keep sowing the seed about 2 weeks apart for a continuous crop. In warm climates it is wise to grow radishes in between shady plants such as sweet corn. They do best in weather that is not too hot ( 20-25 celcius)
11 May 20, Noah (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
I highly recommend radish to beginners as they are fun and easy to grow
22 May 20, karen (Australia - temperate climate)
I second that!
06 May 20, judith (Australia - temperate climate)
In Tasmania its late May and getting much cooler. My radish plants are quite vigorous but have no roots only leaves. Is this because its not warm enough.
Showing 1 - 10 of 121 comments

A general fertiliser will do. If you start with good rich soil then you really don't need to fertilise again.

- Anonymous

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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