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Growing Marrow

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    S S P P            

(Best months for growing Marrow in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays P = Sow seed

  • Grow in seed trays, and plant out in 4-6 weeks. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 68°F and 95°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 35 - 47 inches apart
  • Harvest in 12-17 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Peas, Beans, Onions, Sweetcorn
  • Avoid growing close to: Potatoes
  • Young marrow

This is a large, well grown version of zucchini/courgette. Skin maybe light yellow or white. Grow on raised mounds of earth/compost. Mulch to retain moisture and reduce weed growth.

Powdery mildew can be a problem especially in humid weather.

Culinary hints - cooking and eating Marrow

Good, cut in thick slices, seeds removed and stuffed with mince or spicy vegetable mix then baked in the oven

Your comments and tips

06 Sep 18, Rita (United Kingdom - warm/temperate climate)
Hi,I was given some Apple Cucumber seeds but they do not look like the Australian pictures when grown. Very large green/stripe and round.Lovely yellow flowers which look like courgettes.Any ideas? Thanks, Rita.
09 Sep 18, Angela (Australia - temperate climate)
I should have mentioned- my variety is Richmond Green Apple cucumber. Our climate has hot dry summers. In my wicking beds, which give good consistent moisture, this variety was by far the best and most consistent producer of the 7 types I tried last year.
10 Sep 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
If you go to the website
09 Sep 18, Angela (Australia - temperate climate)
That’s what my apple cucumbers look like. They can get quite large (about the size of an orange, but slightly oblate) if water and fertiliser are plentiful. In hotter weather I find they are smaller, but more are produced. In very hot weather here they stop producing until it cools down. The stripe is more pronounced on the larger fruits. I like to eat them :)
07 Sep 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Look on the internet and try and work out what you have. Hand pollinate the female flowers and see what vegie you have.
04 Sep 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Jane - blossom end rot, use 1-2 teaspoon of Epsom salts in 8-9l of water and apply to the soil. The yellow fruit - have they been pollinated and starting to grow the marrow. If the female flower of marrows, cuies, melons, pumpkin are not pollinated the little fruit will turn a different colour and shrivel up and die. The white spots could be a fungi or disease from damp conditions. Water in the morning so the plants and fruit dry out quick.
05 Sep 18, Jane (Australia - temperate climate)
Mike - my apology. I don't know how I missed your reply post. Re: The small yellow fruit that came off was the beginning of a marrow (I think?).On second thought - upon rereading your post, I have just realised that small,bulbous-like 'fruit' was a female plant and that, as you point out, it was not pollinated! Aha! A light comes on. So yes, that's what happened. What a vast difference between knowing and learning. We are on tight water restrictions (fortunate to have a drop of water!). I was using tank water in the afternoon although I have stopped the late afternoon watering.The leaves have improved 99% and marrows are forming which is so exciting. My one concern, perhaps, is that they might be adversely affected if they grow on the ground i.e. the ground resting side might soft,go brown and invite bugs/rot or something when they (prayerfully) reach that stage. Not sure what to do to help them.Watching them. When I water in the mornings should I water the foliage or just the ground? And will it be better to use sugar cane mulch? I am using dry leaves and grass cuttings (from when drought had not hit so hard). Thankyou for your post.Appreciated.
07 Sep 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Do you have bees in your yard. If not read up about hand pollinating. Most of these vine crops have male and female flowers on the one plant. Put some mulch under the marrow if you are worried. Any thing will do. But marrow zucchini grow so quick you shouldn't have to worry. As much as possible water the soil. By watering in the morning the wind and sun will dry plants quickly.
22 Aug 18, Jane (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Just looking at the graph depicting the brst times to grow marrow. Looks like I sow'd and planted early. *Why is it important to sow and plant at the right time? Thankyou in advance.
23 Aug 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
FROM the bottom of the page. -"This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided." To sow around the best time is to give yourself the best chance to produce a good crop. Like you wouldn't plant something in summer if it says to plant in winter.
Showing 1 - 10 of 53 comments

I'm looking for seed for marrows that my grand farther grew they lumps on them

- James

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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