Growing Luffa, also Loofah, plant sponge

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
      S S P            

(Best months for growing Luffa in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays P = Sow seed

  • Grow in seed trays, and plant out in 4-6 weeks. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 68°F and 86°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 18 - 30 inches apart
  • Harvest in 11-12 weeks. Use as a back scratcher.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Peas, Beans, Onions, Sweetcorn
  • Avoid growing close to: Potatoes
  • Luffa on vine

This type of squash while not strictly a vegetable can be eaten when young. They are more commonly grown to use when mature and dried.

The plants need warmth to grow successfully. Keep inside until all risk of frost is gone.

They grow on vines similar to cucumbers.

A large loofa makes a great back scratcher. Luffa can be cut into many shapes for scrubbing pads, padding, and other uses.

Culinary hints - cooking and eating Luffa

The luffa flowers and fruits are soft and edible when young and are sometimes cooked and eaten like squash or okra. Loofah has been an important food source in many Asian cultures. The leaves and vines should not be eaten.

Your comments and tips

23 Jul 20, Dan (USA - Zone 5a climate)
How much sun do they need
09 Jul 20, Shemainee Carranza (USA - Zone 10a climate)
When is the lates to plant Luffa for zone 10?
09 Jul 20, Liz (New Zealand - sub-tropical climate)
Check this page www.gardenate.com/plant/Luffa?zone=15
02 Feb 20, Kristina Fischer (USA - Zone 9a climate)
I was just given a huge jar of very healthy looking loofah seeds. Our cold frame just collapsed after six years of heavy use and we don't have funds for another one. Would it be possible to plant the loofah seeds in peat pots in April and still harvest loofah by fall?
09 Feb 20, Lura (USA - Zone 8a climate)
check your electric company you can find crates free the ones from the electric company have frames on top perfect for cold frame lid, most have plastic wrapped around them and a pallet bottom. They are a little tall for a cold frame but there are only 4 studs ( in corners) and a few thin cross boards to stabilize the container. We remove the nice frames from the tops, cut the studs to the right height, use the cross boards to frame the bottom. Two boxes will make one 4 x 4 cold frame. every bit free except screws or nails to reassemble.
30 Jan 20, (USA - Zone 9b climate)
What does plant undercover mean. Inside with a plastic lid?
30 Jan 20, Liz at Gardenate (New Zealand - sub-tropical climate)
For Gardenate : Young seedlings can be affected by sudden changes of temperature. To prevent this seedtrays are usually kept under cover for a few weeks. Any area which mantains even, frost-free, temperatures 24 hours will do. e.g. Unheated greenhouses, a covered area close to the house, or small frames covered with frostcloth or with a piece of fabric like old bed sheets. If possible put the trays above ground level. Too much strong sunlight can do as much damage as cold nights to seedlings.
03 Jan 20, Alaina Seyssel (USA - Zone 8b climate)
What accommodations should I make for growing Luffa in 8b?
04 Jan 20, Mindi (USA - Zone 8a climate)
We live in zone 8a and the biggest challenge for us when we grow Luffa is that they climb SO high and fast in the summer. I'd suggest planning on some serious trellising as the Luffa gourds get pretty heavy before they dry out.
25 Oct 19, j d taylor (USA - Zone 9a climate)
where to get loofa seeds and best type to grow here
Showing 1 - 10 of 34 comments

What accommodations should I make for growing Luffa in 8b?

- Alaina Seyssel

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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