Growing Garlic

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
                P P    

(Best months for growing Garlic in USA - Zone 5a regions)

P = Plant cloves

September: Garlic can overwinter. Cover with a good layer of mulch . In areas where frost persists into March/ April, expect to harvest your garlic in June/July.

October: Garlic can overwinter. Cover with a good layer of mulch . In areas where frost persists into March/ April, expect to harvest your garlic in June/July.

  • Easy to grow. Plant cloves. Best planted at soil temperatures between 50°F and 95°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 4 - 5 inches apart
  • Harvest in 17-25 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Beets, Carrots, Cucumbers, Dill, Tomatoes, Parsnips
  • Avoid growing close to: Asparagus, Beans, Brassicas, Peas, Potatoes

Your comments and tips

15 Oct 18, Susan harrer (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Do you plant elephant garlic the same time and way as regular garlic ? Is elephant garlic is actually leeks ?
25 Oct 18, Silke Wolf (USA - Zone 8a climate)
I have just tried planting elephant garlic, Oct 1. I have seen nothing sprouting as of yet. I did plant regular store bought garlic on sept 15th and that has jumped up and sprouted and grown like crazy within a week! So, Im a tad disappointed in the elephant garlic.
02 Jul 19, Bea (USA - Zone 9a climate)
Best type of garlic for Vegas, 9A.
22 Sep 19, Kathy (USA - Zone 6a climate)
We don't have to buy garlic from China... please....try to grow some or double check with your store as to the origin of their garlic and if from China, then talk to store manager and store headquarters.. Thanks...
01 Mar 20, (USA - Zone 5a climate)
Hi Newbie here to garlic I'm in 5a zone northern state in USA Garlic says best in our zone to plant in September and October but it says 17-24 weeks to harvest yet it says it needs a temperature of 50 to 90゚ That would put it into our Winter season shortly after planting them can someone explain maybe I misunderstanding What it is saying. Thank you (Gardenate reply : I have added the information that explains what to do if planting late in the year)
07 Nov 20, Cici (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Zones 5 and 6 plant garlic mid Oct-early Nov. Cover with straw lightly. Then after good frost/freeze cover with total of 4-6" straw. Come spring, pull back some of straw to allow shoots to see sun. Garlic is usually harvested In mid July for most. Softnecks are more late June early July. Either one, when bottom 2-3 leaves start turning brown it's time to harvest. Don't wait or it will split and rot. Dry 2-3 weeks by hanging in shaded airy place under cover like barn, shed, porch etc. Then trim leaves and roots and store in paper bags or baskets for long storage out of direct sun or bright light. Will keep 6-12 months depending on variety.
07 Mar 20, Joe (USA - Zone 5b climate)
Never grew garlic before. Ready to flip garden bed and prepare to plant. Is Northwestern Pennsylvania in spring to early to plant? Thanks.
12 Mar 20, Martin (USA - Zone 6b climate)
We are growing garlic for first time and put them in in the Fall (Oct). They grew rapidly and then laid down for the winter. We are expecting them to jump up as the weather warms and should be ready by early June. From what I understand if you plant in the Spring you will have stunted bulbs.
05 Jul 20, Mike mahaffy (USA - Zone 8a climate)
What is the most flavorful garlic? In Central South Carolina (Zone 8A), is hard neck, or softneck garlic, better to plant?
28 Jul 20, John Madison (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Your notes say garlic is not recommended for zone 9 b. Why not? Thanks
Showing 11 - 20 of 30 comments

Do you plant elephant garlic the same time and way as regular garlic ? Is elephant garlic is actually leeks ?

- Susan harrer

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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