Growing Garlic

Allium sativum : Amaryllidaceae / the onion family

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
                P P    

(Best months for growing Garlic in USA - Zone 5a regions)

  • P = Plant cloves

September: Garlic can overwinter. Cover with a good layer of mulch . In areas where frost persists into March/ April, expect to harvest your garlic in June/July.

October: Garlic can overwinter. Cover with a good layer of mulch . In areas where frost persists into March/ April, expect to harvest your garlic in June/July.

  • Easy to grow. Plant cloves. Best planted at soil temperatures between 50°F and 95°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 4 - 5 inches apart
  • Harvest in 17-25 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Beets, Carrots, Cucumbers, Dill, Tomatoes, Parsnips
  • Avoid growing close to: Asparagus, Beans, Brassicas, Peas, Potatoes
  • Almost ready to harvest
  • Garlic cloves
  • Young garlic shoots

Garlic is traditionally planted in cold weather and harvested in summer ("plant on the shortest day, harvest on the longest"). Plant the cloves (separated from the bulb), point upwards, deep enough to just cover with soil. A fairly tough and easy-growing plant but in better soil with regular watering you will get a better crop. On poorer soil, and forgetting to water them, you will still get some garlic, only not quite so much, maybe just a single large bulb.

Leave a garlic to go to seed, and you will probably get plenty of self-sown plants the following year.

To keep for later use, dig up and leave to dry out for a day or so after the green shoots die down. To use immediately, pull up a head when you need it, or cut and use the green shoots.

Culinary hints - cooking and eating Garlic

Cut the growing shoots or use the entire young garlic plants as 'garlic greens' in stir-fry.

Your comments and tips

09 Sep 22, Donna (USA - Zone 7b climate)
I’m in 7b. Will garlic thrive in pots and standing gardens?
20 Sep 22, Brian Simpson (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Pots are the best place to grow your garlic, make sure you give it lots of fertilizer and do not plan more then 3 garlic bulbs. I started growing ma few in pots this year and they already starting to grow or sprout out, and I'm planting some in pots in a few weeks. So to answer the question Yes it thrive in Pots, raised beds or a small inground garden. Come check out harvest for 2022 on social media
14 Sep 22, Anonymous (USA - Zone 7b climate)
It says to plant now. It all comes down to how fertile your soil is and whether you water them enough. Pots require more attention.
18 Aug 22, Clifford S Foy (USA - Zone 8a climate)
bOUGHT GARLIC FROM cOSTCO LAST YEAR AND IT BLOOMED BEAUTIFUL BUT NO GARLIC. wHAT i DID WRONG??
04 Sep 22, (USA - Zone 6a climate)
Did you plant it the right time of the year.
18 Aug 22, Kristi (USA - Zone 8b climate)
Hello, we’d like to purchase garlic to grow in FL zone 8b. Which types would you recommend? Thanks so much!
06 Aug 22, R Hulse (USA - Zone 7b climate)
There are several types of garlic, but the main two are hardneck and softneck. Hardneck is for colder climates and softneck is for warmer climates. Not sure about elephant garlic or any of the others but you can search the internet to find out what zones they grow best in.
09 Jul 22, Terry Scott (USA - Zone 3b climate)
I'm confused, nothing is said about over wintering for garlic, I live in zone 3b. Can I do all the above prep and cover with hay in my plot?
03 Jul 22, Rhonda Bowen (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Just to clarify what I think I understand…. If I buy one bulb of garlic and break it apart into individual cloves, I plant each clove and expect to get a growing bulb. Am I one the right track here?
05 Jul 22, (USA - Zone 4a climate)
Yes one clove will then grow and produce a new clump of cloves.
Showing 1 - 10 of 74 comments

Yes one clove will then grow and produce a new clump of cloves.

- Anonymous

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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