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Growing Garlic

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
                P P    

(Best months for growing Garlic in USA - Zone 5a regions)

P = Plant cloves

September: Garlic can overwinter. Cover with a good layer of mulch . In areas where frost persists into March/ April, expect to harvest your garlic in June/July.

October: Garlic can overwinter. Cover with a good layer of mulch . In areas where frost persists into March/ April, expect to harvest your garlic in June/July.

  • Easy to grow. Plant cloves. Best planted at soil temperatures between 50°F and 95°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 4 - 5 inches apart
  • Harvest in 17-25 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Beets, Carrots, Cucumbers, Dill, Tomatoes, Parsnips
  • Avoid growing close to: Asparagus, Beans, Brassicas, Peas, Potatoes
  • Almost ready to harvest
  • Garlic cloves
  • Young garlic shoots

Garlic is traditionally planted in cold weather and harvested in summer ("plant on the shortest day, harvest on the longest"). Plant the cloves (separated from the bulb), point upwards, deep enough to just cover with soil. A fairly tough and easy-growing plant but in better soil with regular watering you will get a better crop. On poorer soil, and forgetting to water them, you will still get some garlic, only not quite so much, maybe just a single large bulb.

Leave a garlic to go to seed, and you will probably get plenty of self-sown plants the following year.

To keep for later use, dig up and leave to dry out for a day or so after the green shoots die down. To use immediately, pull up a head when you need it, or cut and use the green shoots.

Culinary hints - cooking and eating Garlic

Cut the growing shoots or use the entire young garlic plants as 'garlic greens' in stir-fry.

Your comments and tips

27 May 20, paul hansard (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Where do I buy Garlic bulbs & ginger to grow ? Please.
28 May 20, (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Boondie seeds or other seed selling websites.
25 May 20, Jon Hosford (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
Garlic is best planted before the extremely cold weather sets in so that it can sprout and grow healthy leaves. It will then use this solid start to set healthy bulbs in the spring months. When tops start to flag, cease watering. Pull the garlic when the bulbs are strong and healthy and allow the leaves to die right back before storing. I live in a cool climate (Tasmania) and am able to keep garlic without it sprouting for use in cooking until July/August .
26 Apr 20, David G (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Hi there We're in Sydney, which is officially sub-tropical. Should I plant garlic now, or wait until late May/June? Thanks David
27 Apr 20, Anon (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
The planting guide says May to July. It looks like it is going to turn cold this weekend, time to plant I think. I have never grown it. They say plant around the shortest day of the year and harvest the longest - sunlight hours that is. Some people say that isn't true.
02 May 20, mick (Australia - temperate climate)
I planted early last year and lost most of my crop early on because it was too hot. This year I planted mid April and apart from having to shade the crop a couple of days the temperature is perfect. The crop is looking great and growing fast. I'd be thinking you may need to experiment as well as hope nature doesn't decide to play games with the seasons. You might next year consider staggering 2 bulbs every 2 weeks for say 6 weeks and recording the results. That way the following year you should nail it. Good luck and keep trying. Determined gardeners eventually find the sweet spot.
05 May 20, M (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
I was going to suggest staggering the planting over a few weeks. Seasons can vary from year to year so much. The year before last it didn't turn to cool/cold weather until well into July here. Last week we had night temps (6.7 and 7.9) within 2-3 degree of our normal coldest winter temps.
22 Apr 20, Chris Smith (Australia - temperate climate)
Can i grow garlic in 30 litre pot
23 Apr 20, Anon (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
You can grow most things in a pot if big enough. Need a lot more attention to them the smaller the pot.
12 Apr 20, geoffrey Neely (Australia - temperate climate)
Hi,my wife and i are first time growers of Russian garlic,my question is.we planted our garlic 2 weeks ago to the day so far only one seed has germinated.We soaked our garlic in seasol overnight prior to planting n a garden soil bought from local landscape supplier and mixed with natural occurring soil on our property.We watered the garlic in after planting and put a thin cover of sugarcane mulch over them, that first week only watered one more time the second week had 3-4 days of rain.Do you think there is a problem as only one shoot has penetrated the soil out of 630 planted,am i worrying about nothing will the rest of the cloves germinate in days or weeks to come should i keep watering should i not.thank you
Showing 1 - 10 of 680 comments

Just buy NZ Garlic from the fruit shop (which will still be open during quarantine), break it apart and plant the largest cloves and eat the little ones.

- Raych

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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