Growing Garlic

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
                P P    

(Best months for growing Garlic in USA - Zone 5a regions)

P = Plant cloves

September: Garlic can overwinter. Cover with a good layer of mulch . In areas where frost persists into March/ April, expect to harvest your garlic in June/July.

October: Garlic can overwinter. Cover with a good layer of mulch . In areas where frost persists into March/ April, expect to harvest your garlic in June/July.

  • Easy to grow. Plant cloves. Best planted at soil temperatures between 10°C and 35°C. (Show °F/in)
  • Space plants: 10 - 12 cm apart
  • Harvest in 17-25 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Beets, Carrots, Cucumbers, Dill, Tomatoes, Parsnips
  • Avoid growing close to: Asparagus, Beans, Brassicas, Peas, Potatoes
  • Almost ready to harvest
  • Garlic cloves
  • Young garlic shoots

Garlic is traditionally planted in cold weather and harvested in summer ("plant on the shortest day, harvest on the longest"). Plant the cloves (separated from the bulb), point upwards, deep enough to just cover with soil. A fairly tough and easy-growing plant but in better soil with regular watering you will get a better crop. On poorer soil, and forgetting to water them, you will still get some garlic, only not quite so much, maybe just a single large bulb.

Leave a garlic to go to seed, and you will probably get plenty of self-sown plants the following year.

To keep for later use, dig up and leave to dry out for a day or so after the green shoots die down. To use immediately, pull up a head when you need it, or cut and use the green shoots.

Culinary hints - cooking and eating Garlic

Cut the growing shoots or use the entire young garlic plants as 'garlic greens' in stir-fry.

Your comments and tips

11 Aug 20, Dan (USA - Zone 7a climate)
I bought a pack of two christopher ranch organic garlic from grocery store. How do I know if it's soft neck or hard neck.
28 Jul 20, John Madison (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Your notes say garlic is not recommended for zone 9 b. Why not? Thanks
06 Aug 20, Anonymous (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Read the notes here and then think about your climate, weather and soil temperatures. If it says you need this this and that and you don't have those conditions then it is not likely to grow. Some crops are cool weather some need warm/hot temps.
05 Jul 20, Mike mahaffy (USA - Zone 8a climate)
What is the most flavorful garlic? In Central South Carolina (Zone 8A), is hard neck, or softneck garlic, better to plant?
23 Jun 20, Simeon Tshwene (South Africa - Semi-arid climate)
How do I grow garlic
24 Jun 20, (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
I suggest you google
08 Jun 20, Sharon Rogers (Australia - tropical climate)
We live in wet tropics on Mt Bartle Frere. We have garlic cloves now shooting and raised garden beds. What chance do we have and if so what natural fertilzers and when to use them.
09 Jun 20, Anon (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Have good draining soil also. You are growing in the drier part of the year.
09 Jun 20, Anon (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Also google about garlic and read up.
09 Jun 20, Anon (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Buy rooster booster from Bunnings or go to a farm produce supplier and buy an organic fert. Both of those may only sell 15-25kg bags. Or go and see if you can buy a smaller quantity from Bunnings nurseries or Coles Woolworths. You could try Seasol or something similar but make sure it has NPK %.
Showing 1 - 10 of 690 comments

I live in Ponte Vedra (about 15 miles south of Jacksonville Beach). I grew a little bit of garlic last year in our raised garden bed. It didn't seem to have a lot of flavor. I see that you don't recommend garlic for zone 9B. Why is that?

- Becky

Please provide your email address if you are hoping for a reply


All comments are reviewed before displaying on the site, so your posting will not appear immediately

Gardenate App

Put Gardenate in your pocket. Get our app for iPhone, iPad or Android to add your own plants and record your plantings and harvests

Planting Reminders

Join our 60,000+ gardeners who already use Gardenate and subscribe to the free Gardenate planting reminders email newsletter.


Home | Vegetables and herbs to plant | Climate zones | About Gardenate | Contact us | Privacy Policy

This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
We cannot help if you are overrun by giant slugs.