Growing French tarragon

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    S P P              

(Best months for growing French tarragon in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays P = Plant out (transplant) seedlings

  • Plant cuttings or root division. Best planted at soil temperatures between 50°F and 77°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 16 - 24 inches apart
  • Harvest in 30-40 days. Pick leaves when young for best flavour.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Aubergine (Eggplant) and Capsicum (Peppers)
  • New Spring growth

French tarragon a half hardy perennial herb that is native of southern Europe. It is frost tender - which may be one of the reasons that it is not particularly widely grown - French tarragon is easy to grow but rarely sets seeds. It is propagated by division, or from cuttings.
Seed grown tarragon is usually Russian tarragon which does not have such a good flavour.

French tarragon must have a sunny position The site should be sheltered from winds and winter frosts. Keep well watered in dry weather. In autumn, mulch plants with a thick layer of straw or similar, to protect it over the winter. Tarragon prefers well-drained soil which is not too high in nutrients. It will do equally well in full sun or partial shade. 

Culinary hints - cooking and eating French tarragon

Tarragon goes well with fish, pork, beef, poultry, game, potatoes, tomatoes, carrots, and most vegetables.  Tarragon can be used in cream sauces, herbed butters and vinegars, soups, sour creams, and yogurt.
However, it can be overpowering in large amounts.

Your comments and tips

12 Apr 20, Sarina (Australia - temperate climate)
Where can I buy French tarragon plants or seeds now (April)?
14 Apr 20, Liz (New Zealand - temperate climate)
French tarragon should be grown from cuttings. Seeds are usually Russian tarragon, which is not such a good flavour.
18 Mar 20, johan smith (South Africa - Dry summer sub-tropical climate)
Where can I purchase Tarragon plants
19 Mar 20, (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
Try Mountain Herb Estate on the internet.
18 Mar 20, Anon (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
Try seed selling companies on the internet.
16 Feb 20, Cassie (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
I grow mine in a big pot that gets 5-6hrs sun in summer. Yes it seems to grow as a prostrate plant, not upright. Before first frost, i cut it right back (and stuff all excess stemms in bottles of white wine vinegar), put a light sugar cane mulch over the plant and drag the pot under the eaves to mitigate against our deep frosts. 4 years surviving so far. Will try propagating cuttings this year
06 Jan 19, adrian (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Is it possible for French Tarragon to survive in Brisbane's climate? If so what special things if any should to do?
06 Jan 19, Mike Logan (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Read the notes here it tells you how to look after it in sub tropical climate.
12 Dec 18, Derek (New Zealand - temperate climate)
my french tarragon took off like a rocket in early spring, now has dwindled away. Should I spread and replant what's left of the tubers, or wait and hope for next spring?
13 Dec 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Look on the internet - how to grow tarragon - pay attention to how long it grows when to harvest etc.
Showing 1 - 10 of 45 comments

Is it possible for French Tarragon to survive in Brisbane's climate? If so what special things if any should to do?

- adrian

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