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Growing Zucchini, also Courgette/Marrow, Summer squash

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    S P P P            

(Best months for growing Zucchini in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays P = Sow seed

  • Grow in seed trays, and plant out in 4-6 weeks. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 70°F and 95°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 20 - 35 inches apart
  • Harvest in 6-9 weeks. Cut the fruit often to keep producing.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Corn, beans, nasturtiums, parsley, Silverbeet, Tomatoes
  • Avoid growing close to: Potatoes

Your comments and tips

10 May 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Check to see if you have bees working in your area/garden otherwise you might have to hand pollinate in the mornings when the female flowers come out. they are only open for a 1/2 day.
06 Apr 18, Gaynor (New Zealand - sub-tropical climate)
How can I grow zucchini’s in Auckland in the winter thanks.
09 Apr 18, mike (New Zealand - temperate climate)
I don't believe you can grow them during winter, maybe with a good glass house and heater but you'd also probably need to hand pollinate.
04 Feb 18, Peter Wilson (New Zealand - temperate climate)
How can I tell when my zuchinies are ready for picking
04 Feb 18, Quarteracre Kiwi (New Zealand - temperate climate)
Hi Peter - Leave them as little or as big as you like. If you pick them when they are about 25cm long, they will be lovely, fleshy and seedless. If you leave them past this point, they will quickly become marrow, which are watery and full of seeds. Give them a twist and they will come off with a bit of stalk. They will keep for a good while in your veg chiller of your fridge. If you get lots, you can grate them and freeze them in ziplock bags for winter. Give them a squeeze in a teatowel after thawing though.
30 Jan 18, thabo mofokeng (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
My babymarrows are rotten from inside. Thee past two years I never experienced any problems. They do not show from the outside that they are rotten inside some have worms inside. Pls advise. Thabo
13 Jan 18, John Bass (New Zealand - temperate climate)
re the question of 17 December. Tips of new courgettes turn yellow and then die back. Cause and treatment please.
17 Sep 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Probably not being pollinated by bees. Female flower is only open for a day or so and generally shut by lunch. Read up about hand pollinating.
08 Jan 18, Tony Barnes (Australia - temperate climate)
Planted my zucchini early in raised beds. Brilliant start looked good producing well. Then these and later plantings have started well but the leaves get a shrivelled look around the edges and only male flowers are produced. When I pull these plants out the roots are quite rotten looking. Am in Northern Rivers area NSW so very humid with warm/hot winds.
09 Jan 18, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Try growing from Sept - as you say hot and humid now.
Showing 11 - 20 of 272 comments

Zuchinni, pumpkin, rockmelon and such are now just starting. Early fruiting generally does not get pollinated as well as it does in a week or two's time. From your description your female fruit buds are not pollinated and then they rot and get infested with fruit fly larvae or similar. Try hand pollinating your female buds with a male bud at this stage in the season and this will secure fruit production. Strip the male buds covers and wiggle around the inside of a female bud, that will ensure pollination. Use your finger in soil if it comes out with material on it don't water, if not, water well once every 3 days. Regards Matt

- Matt

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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