Growing Tomato

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    S P P P            

(Best months for growing Tomato in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays P = Sow seed

  • Grow in seed trays, and plant out in 4-6 weeks. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 16°C and 35°C. (Show °F/in)
  • Space plants: 40 - 60 cm apart
  • Harvest in 8-17 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Asparagus, Chervil,Carrot, Celery, Chives, Parsley, Marigold, Basil
  • Avoid growing close to: Rosemary, Potatoes, Fennel, Cucumber

Your comments and tips

17 Aug 20, Jerry nordin (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Planted indeterminate in April hard freeze late in may covered plants at night until night temps reached 60f. Planted in elevated box planters. Is this enough soil for the roots plants never really produced. Im looking at the last tomato of the year 8-17-20.
19 Aug 20, Anonymous (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Tomatoes need good rich deep soil. Dig your soil about 40cm deep x about 60cm across. Put some fertiliser in the bottom of the hole and mix with some soil. Keep doing this until the hole is only 10cm deep. Put some Epsom salts in the hole also. When the plant has grown 60-80cm high fill the soil in around the plant and even hill it up a bit. Put some compost/mulch around the plant. Tomatoes need a good deep watering 2-3 times a week.
10 Aug 20, Gina (USA - Zone 10b climate)
I grow everything in pots due to lack of any place to have a full garden. After the tomato plant is done for the season, what can I grow in the container that will enhance the soil for the next year's tomato plantings? In years past, if I reuse the same soil the plants do not do very well year after year. It is not easy to dump the old soil and start fresh - again, no real space to do so. I had two San Marzano plants that did very well plus one small patio tomatoe Any suggestions are appreciated. Thank you!
12 Aug 20, colleen (USA - Zone 10b climate)
I suggest growing a legume you like--or a succession of them. You could start with beans and then peas when the days get very short. If you like fava beans, those are very useful--you can eat the tender shoots and leaves, and they make big beautiful plants with pretty flowers that look so cheerful in the coolest months (but they take a LONG time to make beans!). When the beans/peas are done, leave their roots behind in the soil. They'll add a little nitrogen, though not as much if you let them grow to maturity. You will still need to replenish other nutrients with compost or a good tomato-specific fertilizer in the spring. One thing to consider is that tomatoes catch a lot of diseases that accumulate in the soil year after year, so that might be why you have trouble when reusing the soil. You could try solarizing any infected soil by covering it with clear plastic in full sun for a few hot months (March through June minimum), but that's tough when garden space is precious!
11 Aug 20, Sally O'Neil (USA - Zone 10a climate)
Compost and/or Manure
30 Jul 20, lisa johnson (USA - Zone 8b climate)
cannot get my tomatoes to form fruit - in large containers - dropping flowers before forming - all varieties - healthy plants but no fruit - extremely hot in Southern Alabama with humidity and good rain - what times of year are best to plant —please advise!
10 Aug 20, Janelle (USA - Zone 9b climate)
I just pull mine for the same reason. Is too hot to fruit. When the flower form the sun burn it. And the rain doesn't help much. If you are able to move it under a roof and keep it with sunlight, you may hold on until it gets cooler. It will produce then. Also it is time to start sowing tomatoes seeds indoor or in shade. Good luck!
22 Jul 19, Gerald Kent (USA - Zone 10a climate)
What is the best tasting tomato to grow in zone 10a in Westlake Village California, area code 91361
10 Aug 20, Gina (USA - Zone 10b climate)
we had great success growing san marzano (redorta) tomatoes... great for homemade pasta sauces!
18 Jul 20, Jessica (USA - Zone 10a climate)
The best tasting tomato depends on what you value in a tomato. There are thousands of tomato varieties and you just need to find one that you like. I suggest you start with indeterminate heirlooms first, unless you a beginner gardener, then I would go with Hybrids. Good luck with your harvests.
Showing 11 - 20 of 36 comments

we had great success growing san marzano (redorta) tomatoes... great for homemade pasta sauces!

- Gina

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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