Growing Tomato

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    S P P P            

(Best months for growing Tomato in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays P = Sow seed

  • Grow in seed trays, and plant out in 4-6 weeks. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 16°C and 35°C. (Show °F/in)
  • Space plants: 40 - 60 cm apart
  • Harvest in 8-17 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Asparagus, Chervil,Carrot, Celery, Chives, Parsley, Marigold, Basil
  • Avoid growing close to: Rosemary, Potatoes, Fennel, Cucumber

Your comments and tips

08 Jun 20, Ryan Riendeau (USA - Zone 10a climate)
Earth-friendly beneficial nematodes seek out and kill grubs and other soil-inhabiting insects. They come on a sponge (invisible to naked eye) that you soak in water, put in a sprayer and spray your dirt or lawn. They will multiply over time and continue to kill grubs You can buy them online or at your local nursery.
28 Mar 18, SavegeSwagPlanter (USA - Zone 10b climate)
When should I plant a tomato plant in Zone 10b?
09 Aug 20, Sandra G. (USA - Zone 10b climate)
I’m zone 10b as well; I started my tomatoes in early February, the weather here is never too cold, so the worst that can happen is that they “overwinter “ and wake in the springtime. I had volunteer tomatoes come up in OCT & NOV and they just grew slowly in a container until they woke in mid mid March and then grew vigorously in April and they’re still giving fruit. These were cherry and Roma tomatoes. I’ve also been sowing seeds every two weeks with determinant (New York, Purple Russian & beefsteak) tomatoes. I freeze all the overages for winter. So, basically, in 10b in southern Cali you can plant anytime and you’ll be fine.
01 May 17, Jack Zampella (USA - Zone 6b climate)
I am hoping that you will be able to answer this question for me. I have raised beds that I vegetable garden in. Everything I have read over the past 10 years says that 2 inches of compost should be added to the beds yearly which I have done. I fertilize with organic fertilizers. My question is I no longer have room for additional compost in the beds. Should I remove some of the "great" soil from the beds to add additional compost or wait until the compost decomposes to add more( this usually takes about 2 years) Thank you in advance for your help. Jack Zampella
02 May 17, John (Australia - temperate climate)
If you have been adding 2" of compost every year for a number of years I would think your soil is quite fertile. You could, as you suggest, take some off. I would not add any this year, instead I would give the garden bed a dressing of garden or agricultural lime. The continual adding of compost to the soil is great for building up the soil but if there is a lot of organic matter still breaking down you would be safe to leave it for a season. The addition of lime will reduce the acidity and allow the release of a lot of nutrients currently there. Organic matter over time, while enriching the soil, will increase the acidity (lower the pH) and make nutrients less available. Lime reverses this. All the best.
08 May 17, Jack Zampella (USA - Zone 6b climate)
John (Australia) thanks for your response. That was going to be my course of action. You just confirmed it. Again thank you for your input.
31 Dec 15, Del Ramos (USA - Zone 13a climate)
Will Bush Beefsteak Tomato grow in my zone? Any growing recomendations?
27 Jun 15, Econ (USA - Zone 7b climate)
I planted a tumbling Tom from nursery in mid April and it is doing great. If I had to do over I would have bought 5 or 6. I planted about 8 different tomatoe plants with 7 of them indertiminate. So far the best are Lemon Boy. They melt in your mouth!
23 Mar 15, Edie (USA - Zone 7b climate)
What is the best tomato plant and also bush tomato plant for my Zone 7b?
16 Feb 16, Carrie B. (USA - Zone 7b climate)
There is a seed supplier specializing in heirloom in our zone. Southern Exposure Seed Exchange. Even if you don't buy seed the website and catalog are great resources.
Showing 11 - 20 of 24 comments

If you have been adding 2" of compost every year for a number of years I would think your soil is quite fertile. You could, as you suggest, take some off. I would not add any this year, instead I would give the garden bed a dressing of garden or agricultural lime. The continual adding of compost to the soil is great for building up the soil but if there is a lot of organic matter still breaking down you would be safe to leave it for a season. The addition of lime will reduce the acidity and allow the release of a lot of nutrients currently there. Organic matter over time, while enriching the soil, will increase the acidity (lower the pH) and make nutrients less available. Lime reverses this. All the best.

- John

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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