Growing Tomato

Lycopersicon esculentum : Solanaceae / the nightshade family

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    S                  
      T T T            
      P P              

(Best months for growing Tomato in USA - Zone 5a regions)

  • S = Plant undercover in seed trays
  • T = Plant out (transplant) seedlings
  • P = Sow seed
  • Grow in seed trays, and plant out in 4-6 weeks. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 16°C and 35°C. (Show °F/in)
  • Space plants: 40 - 60 cm apart
  • Harvest in 8-17 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Asparagus, Chervil,Carrot, Celery, Chives, Parsley, Marigold, Basil
  • Avoid growing close to: Rosemary, Potatoes, Fennel, Cucumber

Your comments and tips

20 Feb 24, jacob (USA - Zone 10a climate)
my understanding is that root rot is due to a lack of calcium, but calcium is usually plentiful in garden soil. the real issue is with inconsistent watering, meaning the plants cannot properly absorb that calcium. water more!
24 Feb 24, Celeste Archer (Australia - temperate climate)
I think you might have blossom end rot, and root rot mixed up. Blossom end rot occurs on the base of the tomato, and is caused by a lack of calcium (usually -- it could be other things that cause the calcium to be unavailable - PH, lack of water etc.). Blossom end rot causes the tomato to look deformed. Calcium added to the soil at the time of planting is usually adequate to ensure this does not happen. The calcium really needs to be added EARLY in the growing stages. You could also use egg shells -- I would grind/smash up the shells pretty good then work them into the soil of the planting hole; better yet, enrich with egg shells over the winter and early spring in anticipation of future planting. Root rot usually occurs when water sits around the roots of a plant for long periods of time -- bad drainage, excess watering, soil that holds too much water (which is really drainage). If you have proper aeration this usually doesn't happen since the air flow will whisk away excess moisture (provided it isn't a swamp at the roots). Try to create updrafts in your pots -- you want water drainage holes that do double duty -- let the water run off and allow air in. I find that holes at the SIDE BOTTOM of the pot, rather than directly under the pot, work well. It may seem like a hole at the side of the pot will let the soil out -- but pretty much after the first watering this stops happening -- and once the roots take hold it certainly does not happen. No need for drainage material (stones etc.) -- just use soil/compost top to bottom -- expect soil to come out at first when filling the pot -- after that you should be fine. I make my holes rather large -- on a BIG pot these holes are about 3inches (circular). Roots of plants really like air (maybe not direct exposure) but they certainly like the occasional breeze through the soil. Face the hole on the shady side of the pot for a cooling updraft in hot weather.
03 Feb 24, Carol Edwards (USA - Zone 6a climate)
What is the best tomato to grow in my zone
06 Feb 24, (USA - Zone 3a climate)
What ever variety you like to eat.
20 Jan 24, Kim (USA - Zone 7a climate)
What are the Best tomatoes for zone 7A to grow and fertilizer?
13 Oct 23, Tim (USA - Zone 10a climate)
Great advice
18 Sep 23, Tania from Hyde (New Zealand - cool/mountain climate)
I sow mine in late Sept in trays which i then put in the bottom of a large Sistema container with lid...I pop this out in the sun during day...moving lid around for heat and close it at night...if really cold pop in shed with a blanket....or do the same in the tunnel house....it double walls/protects...you can always throw a rug over the sistema for extra....in the morning undo the sistena and before long you have healthy plants. When planting out, i use cardboard boxes to cover at night, as less condensation and if really cold night.....pop that big Sistema over the cardboard box...really helps with protection. Had great sucess over the last few years. Also put sheep dags over the soil in the winter and dig them in before planting out...great microbiome and nitrogen for soil.
28 Jul 23, SilverShine (New Zealand - cool/mountain climate)
Does anyone know where I can source some seeds for the Alboran variety. It is a winter variety for very low temps.
04 Jul 23, Mary Terrill (USA - Zone 9b climate)
What do I need to make a home made good potting soil for grow bags, to grow vegetables?
11 Sep 23, Sid (USA - Zone 10b climate)
A simple potting soil can be made with peat or Coco coir, perlite and any compost in a 1:1:1 ratio. You can use steer manure from lowes or home depot since it is pretty cheap or if your city has a composting program use that for free compost. It's a good idea to add 1-2 cups of fertilizer per cubic foot of soil you prepare with the above recipe. If you want to keep it simple, but a 10-10-10 balanced fertilized and add 2 cups per cubic foot. If you want a more detailed and balanced soil recipe I recommend checking out Buildasoil for info https://buildasoil.com/blogs/news/17627464-build-a-soil-from-scratch-in-2-simple-steps%20
Showing 11 - 20 of 792 comments

It says plant spring/summer, give them time to grow.

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