Growing Tomato

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    S P P P            

(Best months for growing Tomato in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays P = Sow seed

  • Grow in seed trays, and plant out in 4-6 weeks. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 61°F and 95°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 16 - 24 inches apart
  • Harvest in 8-17 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Asparagus, Chervil,Carrot, Celery, Chives, Parsley, Marigold, Basil
  • Avoid growing close to: Rosemary, Potatoes, Fennel, Cucumber

Your comments and tips

05 Jul 08, Glenda Bannan (Australia - tropical climate)
Any one tried growing tomatoes all year round in a tropical climate using a raised garden that does get shade during our hottest part of day???
15 Jul 08, Dianne (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
Damian I think you will find that brown patch is blossom end rot which is caused by uneven watering.
27 Jul 08, Bobby (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
Hi, I want to make homemade chutney using good tomatoes. When are they in season in Melbourne/Victoria please?
28 Jul 08, wayne (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
Last year my tomatoes started really good. Then the foliage seemed to turn black. We didn't have a frost. I didn't get any fruit at all.
24 Aug 08, gareth (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
i have just planted 4 different types of tomatoes roma hybrids big red should i put chook poo on them and what other fertilisers and which is the highest yielder
24 Aug 08, Liz (New Zealand - temperate climate)
Gareth, you can use chook poo but it is very strong and can damage plants if used fresh. Make a 'tea' with it by putting in a bucket of water and leaving it for a few weeks or else use chook poo mixed with compost and broken down.
05 Sep 08, john (Australia - temperate climate)
i have found . if i get some electrical wore. take off plastic coating... then get individual strands of copper wire, and cut to about 2 inches long. then force 1 of these thru each tomato plant at the base .. it gives some protection against disease, but wouldnt be prctical for commercial growers, just home gardeners
15 Sep 08, Steve (Australia - temperate climate)
Hi, I've been planting tomatoes for the last 2 years with success. However, last years fruit were a bit powdery. Any tips on how to stop that? The only thing i add to the soil is compost and occasionally soluble plant food. thanks
17 Sep 08, gareth (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
Steve: it could be that the soil has been drained of its nutrients because tomatos take huge amounts of nutritions perhaps put some beans in the soil as bean put nutrients into the soil
02 Oct 08, SONYA JONES (Australia - tropical climate)
I didn't have much luck with tomatoes this year. They just seem to wilt and die. I can't see any evidence of pest or disease.
Showing 11 - 20 of 691 comments

If you have been adding 2" of compost every year for a number of years I would think your soil is quite fertile. You could, as you suggest, take some off. I would not add any this year, instead I would give the garden bed a dressing of garden or agricultural lime. The continual adding of compost to the soil is great for building up the soil but if there is a lot of organic matter still breaking down you would be safe to leave it for a season. The addition of lime will reduce the acidity and allow the release of a lot of nutrients currently there. Organic matter over time, while enriching the soil, will increase the acidity (lower the pH) and make nutrients less available. Lime reverses this. All the best.

- John

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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