Growing Tomato

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    S P P P            

(Best months for growing Tomato in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays P = Sow seed

  • Grow in seed trays, and plant out in 4-6 weeks. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 61°F and 95°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 16 - 24 inches apart
  • Harvest in 8-17 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Asparagus, Chervil,Carrot, Celery, Chives, Parsley, Marigold, Basil
  • Avoid growing close to: Rosemary, Potatoes, Fennel, Cucumber

Your comments and tips

24 Jun 20, Anonymous (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Little seedlings/plants need a light watering each day - if hot twice a day. Bigger plants need a good watering each 2-3 days. For pots - you need to check the top 10-20mm of soil to see if it is wet or dry. If dry then water. The size of the plant and pot will decide how often you water. You want your soil moist not wet wet. It is a bit of trial and error until you work it out.
20 Jun 20, ben (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
what fertilizer do tomatoes like ?
22 Jun 20, Anonymous (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Try googling what NPK fertiliser tomatoes like.
02 May 20, Mike Begley (South Africa - Dry summer sub-tropical climate)
I live in the Coastal Overberg Region and planted my tomato seedlings in containers during March. They seem to be doing well at 50cm. Have I planted too late to enjoy more than one harvest?
05 May 20, Anon (South Africa - Dry summer sub-tropical climate)
Plant seeds Aug and transplant from Sept to Nov. If you planted indeterminate kinds of tomatoes they will crop over several months.
10 Apr 20, Kerry (South Africa - Humid sub-tropical climate)
Greetings! I'm hoping to start a small organic vegetable garden. Would now be ok to plant tomatoes, lettuce, onion, green pepper etc. I have a partially covered courtyard so I have the option to plant in containers too. Our winters here are not too bad, lovely days, cool/nippy evenings. Please advise. Regards, Kerry.
14 Apr 20, Anon (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
This website is for people to look up when to plant different vegetables etc. Work out your climate zone and check each vegetable when to plant.
09 Apr 20, Amana abda seyid (Australia - temperate climate)
I am from ethiopia i went to ask some thing about tomato. My seedling is falldown and gridling of stem at the base in the green house .how can manage these diseases.
14 Apr 20, (Australia - temperate climate)
Had to say what your problem is, too much water, too little water, too hot. Maybe start again.
30 Mar 20, Jenny (Australia - temperate climate)
For tomatoes what is the best ph level
Showing 11 - 20 of 681 comments

If you have been adding 2" of compost every year for a number of years I would think your soil is quite fertile. You could, as you suggest, take some off. I would not add any this year, instead I would give the garden bed a dressing of garden or agricultural lime. The continual adding of compost to the soil is great for building up the soil but if there is a lot of organic matter still breaking down you would be safe to leave it for a season. The addition of lime will reduce the acidity and allow the release of a lot of nutrients currently there. Organic matter over time, while enriching the soil, will increase the acidity (lower the pH) and make nutrients less available. Lime reverses this. All the best.

- John

Please provide your email address if you are hoping for a reply


All comments are reviewed before displaying on the site, so your posting will not appear immediately

Gardenate App

Put Gardenate in your pocket. Get our app for iPhone, iPad or Android to add your own plants and record your plantings and harvests

Planting Reminders

Join our 60,000+ gardeners who already use Gardenate and subscribe to the free Gardenate planting reminders email newsletter.


Home | Vegetables and herbs to plant | Climate zones | About Gardenate | Contact us | Privacy Policy

This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
We cannot help if you are overrun by giant slugs.