Growing Strawberry Plants

Fragaria : Rosaceae / the rose family

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    P P P P            

(Best months for growing Strawberry Plants in USA - Zone 7a regions)

  • P = Plant out (transplant) seedlings
  • Easy to grow. Plant with crown (of roots) just covered.. Best planted at soil temperatures between 10°C and 20°C. (Show °F/in)
  • Space plants: 30 - 100 cm apart
  • Harvest in approximately 11 weeks. Strawberries bruise easily when ripe, handle carefully. Pick with a small piece of stem attached..
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Better in a bed on their own to allow good sun and air circulation
  • Avoid growing close to: If you are using rotation beds, avoid putting strawberries where you have grown tomatoes, potatoes, peppers or eggplant

Your comments and tips

30 Aug 23, Laura Geisel (USA - Zone 10b climate)
I have ever earring plants, which are new this year. How do I care for them in the fall/winter? And when will they start producing again next year? Thx
13 Jul 23, Ellen (USA - Zone 8b climate)
After plants have made fruit, how to I care for them in the hottest time of the year (July & August)? Then how to I care for them during winter?
13 Jul 23, (USA - Zone 8b climate)
After the fruiting period, it's best to trim off any old yellow leaves and remove any mouldy fruit that may still be attached. This helps maintain plant health. Over winter applying a layer of mulch around the base of the plant provides insulation, helping to regulate soil temperature and retain moisture.
05 Jun 23, Murray Dillner - (New Zealand - cool/mountain climate)
Hi, I livein a cold climate during the winter, how do I look after strawberry plants when they stop flowing. They have heaps of runners. Do I cut them off and store in a container out of the cold? Should I cover them and keep the frost off them and leave in the ground? Novice grower of strawberries Thanks Murray Lake Tarawera Rotorua
07 Jun 23, (Australia - temperate climate)
If you spot any dead or dying leaves on your strawberry plants, go ahead and pluck them off. This will make way for new leaves to sprout up. When it comes to runners it depends on how old the plant is. During the initial couple of years, it's a good idea to snip off the runners as soon as they pop up. This way, the plant can channel its energy into producing more fruit. However, once the third year rolls around, you can start utilizing some of those runners to create new plants through propagation. If you're worried about frost, you can try mulching them. Or, if you prefer, use a row cover, burlap, or even plastic to cover and protect them.
18 May 23, Mari (USA - Zone 9b climate)
How best to get rid of worms in my strawberry plants?
19 May 23, (USA - Zone 11a climate)
Pick them out.
18 May 23, Mari (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Which strawberry plants will grow best in zone 9B California?
29 Apr 23, Nick Sloan (USA - Zone 8b climate)
what exact soil would you reccomend, should i put in it direct sunlight? and is it okay to water the leaves if it’s on a tier planter? thank you so much for your time
08 May 23, (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Any good soil, direct sunlight, water low or in the morning.
Showing 11 - 20 of 342 comments

If you have the time to look after them in pots otherwise in the ground. Just good rich loose soil. Check what varieties grow in your area.

- Anonymous

Please provide your email address if you are hoping for a reply


All comments are reviewed before displaying on the site, so your posting will not appear immediately

Gardenate App

Put Gardenate in your pocket. Get our app for iPhone, iPad or Android to add your own plants and record your plantings and harvests

Planting Reminders

Join 60,000+ gardeners who already use Gardenate and subscribe to the free Gardenate planting reminders email newsletter.


Home | Vegetables and herbs to plant | Climate zones | About Gardenate | Contact us | Privacy Policy

This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
We cannot help if you are overrun by giant slugs.