Growing Sage, also Common Sage

Salvia officinalis : Lamiaceae / the mint family

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    P P P              

(Best months for growing Sage in USA - Zone 7a regions)

  • P = Sow seed
  • Sow in garden. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 10°C and 25°C. (Show °F/in)
  • Space plants: 50 cm apart
  • Harvest in approximately 18 months. Time reduced if grown from cuttings.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Broccoli, Cauliflower, Rosemary, Cabbage and Carrots
  • Common sage
  • Sage flowers

Sage grows well from seeds but it is slow developing.

One plant will usually be enough for the average household.

A plant grown from a cutting will be ready to use in about 3 months.

Stake or protect from strong winds, otherwise the plant may snap off the main stem.

Sage will grow almost anywhere as long as it is in full sun for most of the day. Sage does not like soil that is moist all the time - Avoid frequent watering even in the middle of the summer.

Culinary hints - cooking and eating Sage

The leaves are used to flavour stuffing and meat dishes.
Sage keeps well if dried.

Your comments and tips

10 Sep 22, Cindy Rickard (Australia - tropical climate)
I am moving to Stanthorpe very soon and wanting to make smudge sticks. Would love tips on growing white sage, rosemary, lavender please? How are you going with it Gail and Geraldine?
14 Sep 22, Anonymous (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
Read the notes here about growing each of these and do some research on the internet - growing in cool climate zone.
12 Oct 21, (Canada - Zone 2a Sub-Arctic climate)
Can this sage be used for smudging?
12 Oct 21, Bill Backouris (USA - Zone 10b climate)
in southern california zone 10b when should I prune back my mexican sage, also how severe a prunning is required
27 Sep 21, Sereima (Australia - tropical climate)
Can I grow clary sage in Fiji?
28 Sep 21, Anon (South Africa - Semi-arid climate)
Compare your climate to a New Zealand or Australian climate and then check the planting guide here for that climate. You would be tropic probably.
27 Jul 21, Georgia (USA - Zone 7b climate)
Is sage a biannual plant. After my big plant bloomed it died.
09 Aug 21, Anon (USA - Zone 8a climate)
I just read on-line, sage in cool weather is a perennial and in hot humid weather treat as an annual.
21 Nov 20, Steve (Australia - temperate climate)
We've been growing this sage from a plant ,with fabulous results, ie its growing faster than we are using it. But it has now flowered and we're not sure on what to do, cut the flower off or leave on ,cut the whole plant back or something else. Looking forward to your advice and recommendations. Thank you.
23 Nov 20, Anonymous (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
It probably can be cut back each year, google all these questions, that is how I learn things these days.
Showing 1 - 10 of 62 comments

Take a few pieces and put in water, change the water each 3-4 days. Or break a piece of the plant off with some roots on it and plant in a pot, keep in the shade for a week or two until it is established.

- Anonymous

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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