Growing Rhubarb

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
      P                

(Best months for growing Rhubarb in USA - Zone 5a regions)

P = Plant crowns

  • Easy to grow. Plant pieces of rhizome or roots 8 - 10 cm (3 - 4 in.) deep. Best planted at soil temperatures between 5°C and 20°C. (Show °F/in)
  • Space plants: 90 cm apart
  • Harvest in approximately 1 years. You will have a stronger plant if you leave it for about a year before using..
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Brassicas (Cabbage, Broccoli, Cauliflower, etc)

Your comments and tips

05 May 20, Rossana Parker (Canada - Zone 6b Temperate Warm Summer climate)
Can grow rhubarb in a big pot? And which area in the garden can I place it? Thank you.
08 Jun 20, Anonymous (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
It grows fine in a big pot and is happy in semi-shared areas.
28 Apr 20, Kristen (USA - Zone 6a climate)
Is it too late to plant rhubarb from plants this year in my zone? The chart above says March. Or should I wait until next year? Thank you!
18 Feb 20, Shari (USA - Zone 10a climate)
What about growing rhubarb in the San Jose CA area? I am in a warm, sunny, dry subtropical zone. The last rhubarb I planted was Victoria. It was pithy and green and bothered my stomach. I was going to try KangaRhu which supposedly is bred for warmer climes. I am a transplanted Midwesterner who misses my rhubarb. Has anyone had successful experience in my area? What type?
30 Dec 20, Rebekah Sandell (USA - Zone 8a climate)
I used to live in both San Jose and Sunnyvale. Our Rhubarb plants were the envy of the neighborhood. We planted Strawberry Rhubarb we got from OSH garden (sorry) you might try the Santa Clara County Master Gardeners to find out which type is best for San Jose.
27 Aug 18, Merri (USA - Zone 10a climate)
I am moving to St. Petersburg, FL next month. I will miss my rhubarb if I don't take some with me. Will it grow successfully in zone 10A?
05 Jan 19, Petra (USA - Zone 9a climate)
I am on the east coast neR Jacksonville zone 9a and have tried numerous times to grow Rhubarb. Summers here are just to brutal (hot and humid) for it to grow. I would love for someone to say it is not so and to share how they successfully grow it here
24 Mar 18, Soo-z (USA - Zone 9a climate)
Will rhubarb grow in Jacksonville, Florida -which is Zone 9A?
28 Nov 17, Sandy (USA - Zone 8b climate)
I got a clump of rhubarb from my sister this summer. I have a brick planter in the front yard that had some room, so I planted it there, beside an artichoke plant. Gave it a good dose of vitamin B1, kept it well watered and it has been doing very well, looking very healthy, and, all of a sudden, it turned yellow. It started turning yellow in October. Could it be, it needs more water (I haven't been watering it much, now that it is looking so good)? Could it be the frost (we have had a few frosty mornings. Just in case it's the frost, I've been covering it at night. Thank you for any insight that can be offered.
26 Feb 21, Carol Nevius Jones (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Rhubarb goes dormant in winter and regrow in Spring. Yellowing after a frost is normal.
Showing 11 - 20 of 23 comments

I used to live in both San Jose and Sunnyvale. Our Rhubarb plants were the envy of the neighborhood. We planted Strawberry Rhubarb we got from OSH garden (sorry) you might try the Santa Clara County Master Gardeners to find out which type is best for San Jose.

- Rebekah Sandell

Please provide your email address if you are hoping for a reply


All comments are reviewed before displaying on the site, so your posting will not appear immediately

Gardenate App

Put Gardenate in your pocket. Get our app for iPhone, iPad or Android to add your own plants and record your plantings and harvests

Planting Reminders

Join our 60,000+ gardeners who already use Gardenate and subscribe to the free Gardenate planting reminders email newsletter.


Home | Vegetables and herbs to plant | Climate zones | About Gardenate | Contact us | Privacy Policy

This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
We cannot help if you are overrun by giant slugs.