Growing Radish

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22 Oct 18 Jean (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
I grow radishes a few years ago and they were so hot and spicy and I wanted to have another go, but when I went to the shop they had three or four different type. I just want to know which ones are mild and I can grow here in Brisbane.
06 Sep 19 Terry (Australia - temperate climate)
Most of the heat is in the outer - red - skin. As a small child I'd peel that away (thumbnail worked well) and eat the white flesh inside, which is much milder. The leftover skin can be used in cooking, where they lose the peppery taste. Another way to use overly hot radishes is therefore to cut them into halves or quarters, coat in oil, and roast them in a hot oven (say 220C) until coloured and not too watery inside (30 mins or more).
23 Oct 18 Mike (Australia - temperate climate)
I have grown them for 40+ years and I think it has to do with watering and weather. Better grown into/in the winter - a more even growing conditions - smaller variation of temp and water in the soil. If grown in the hotter weather they can dry out a bit and I think this makes them hotter. Try and grow quickly. Pick as soon as they reach the required size. They will keep in the fridge for weeks.

I have grown them for 40+ years and I think it has to do with watering and weather. Better grown into/in the winter - a more even growing conditions - smaller variation of temp and water in the soil. If grown in the hotter weather they can dry out a bit and I think this makes them hotter. Try and grow quickly. Pick as soon as they reach the required size. They will keep in the fridge for weeks.

- Mike

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