Growing Potato

Solanum tuberosum : Solanaceae / the nightshade family

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
      P P              

(Best months for growing Potato in USA - Zone 5a regions)

  • P = Plant seed potatoes
  • Plant tuber. Best planted at soil temperatures between 50°F and 86°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 12 - 16 inches apart
  • Harvest in 15-20 weeks. Dig carefully, avoid damaging the potatoes.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Peas, Beans, Brassicas, Sweetcorn, Broad Beans, Nasturtiums, Marigolds
  • Avoid growing close to: Cucumber, Pumpkin, Sunflowers, Tomatoes, Rosemary

Your comments and tips

01 Mar 24, Faith Celeste Archer (Canada - Zone 8a Mild Temperate climate)
Also -- please provide information about how large - LARGE SCALE is. That is: is this a 10m x 10m --- or a 30m x 30m -- or 100m x 100m -- if your up to tractor size... then you best bet is to talk to whomever is providing the seed potato in your area. They would best know what to broadcast and how to plant.
29 Feb 24, Faith Celeste Archer (Australia - temperate climate)
Are you looking for SWEET potatoes or regular potatoes ..... I think your climate is better suited for Sweet potatoes -- they are different (different families) and therefore have different instructions: The ideal soil temperature range for planting potatoes is 45 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit (7 to 10 degrees Celsius). After planting, the ideal temperature for growing potatoes is 60 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit (16 to 21 degrees Celsius). Potatoes do best in fertile, well-drained soils. However, potatoes will grow in many types of soils. Soils that are poorly drained tend to produce poorly shaped potatoes and tuber rot. Potatoes do well across a wide range of pH, but prefer slightly acidic soils; a soil pH of 5.3 to 6.0 is typical for potato production. If your soil is more acidic than this, mixing in wood ash will help raise the pH and make your soil more alkaline. Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) are close cousins of morning glory and only distantly related to traditional potatoes. They are tender, so must be protected from frost, and like heat, full sun and regular watering. They crop best at temperatures of 21–26°C (70–80°F) PLEASE CLARIFY which type of potato.
19 Jan 24, Dot (New Zealand - sub-tropical climate)
I want to get a crop in and I need to grow them in planter bags. Can I grow them in layers or only one layer per bag?
19 Jan 24, Celeste Archer (Canada - Zone 5a Temperate Warm Summer climate)
It depends -- not all potatoes are suitable for towering (layering). Additionally, I have found that the potato plant SPENDS A LOT OF ENERGY GROWING UP, UP, UP, as you cover its leaves with soil (leaves have specialized cells designed to collect light - and why you would want to cover them with soil is beyond me this is not really a good move -- leaves are not roots). My recommendation is: if you have a DEEP PLANTER bag starting at about six inches from the bottom -- in sort of a pattern that looks like the 5 on a die (dice) -- make about 3-4 inch round holes -- and make them on the sides that receive light keeping the holes about 10 inches apart (6 inches away from the bottom and 10 inches away from the top of the bag). Fill the bag with a good soil/compost/manure mix of some kind -- starting from the bottom -- when you are level with a hole, place a seed potato there, level or slight below the bottom lip of the hole, and about 3 inches from the side of the bag (so there is soil between the potato and the hole) -- continue up until the bag is full -- the top layer of potatoes can be planted as usual. Yes, the soil will come out of the holes ... not to worry -- just be sure that the soil covers the topmost holes by at least 6-8inches. That is - each potato planted in the bag should have access to a WINDOW (air and light) OR those planted on the top layer (like a usual planting) should be down about 9 inches or so. The Key to this planting is ALL potatoes need to be able to put leaves somewhere -- they will follow the air and light to find that spot -- all potatoes need water -- so you will be watering from the top of the bag only (like a potted plant) -- but you water DEEPLY, since the water needs to make it to the very bottom potato plants -- so maybe you water every 5 days or so... depends on the soil, temperature, amount of light , amount of wind/air (which whisks moisture away), Additionally, ensure there is drainage at the bottom of the bag .... maybe a two inch hole directly at ground level. It might be better to use a crate of some kind.... rather than a bag...anyhow this set up will work with any kind of potato plant without consideration as to whether or not it can handle towering. Hope this helps. Conversion of inches to cm : 1 inch = 2.5cm
14 Oct 23, Anonymous (USA - Zone 10a climate)
Which varieties of Indeterminate potatoes do well in Zone 10A?
10 Oct 23, Celeste Archer (Canada - Zone 5a Temperate Warm Summer climate)
I forgot to mention -- and kept forgetting to post this additional part. When you are "hilling up" you are actually burying LEAVES. Leaves have specialized tissue to COLLECT LIGHT -- that is to say, they are NOT ROOTS -- so to me, burying leaves is NOT CORRECT. It may help to get the potatoes producing sooner, BUT somehow to me if a potato plant made leaves it wanted to collect light -- roots are different, they are sort of thin and round/tube like and are used to transport water and nutrients -- AGAIN: leaves are leaves and roots are roots -- and when I stop and think about it burying leaves doesn't seem right... and my gut instinct is saying that it is not correct. I have also noticed that roots are thinner, and are probably easier for the plant to make/grow -- leaves look like they take a lot of work/nutrition -- so why bury something that is specialized to be above the ground???....... again, the pros may say otherwise and have lots of data and past successes to prove their view point. I have done it both ways (not sure why I did- but I did) and really have not noticed any differences in OVERALL potato production.... so why bury the leaves and make all that extra work hilling up ??? Also, potato tubers seem to like lots of air flow... so make sure the soil is light or ir your in containers ensure lots of holes near the bottom sides to create updrafts..
19 Oct 23, Anonymous (Canada - Zone 3b Temperate Warm Summer climate)
Pull the leaves off.
24 Nov 23, Faith Celeste Archer (Canada - Zone 5a Temperate Warm Summer climate)
Seem like a waste to have the plant grow leaves just to pull them off.... I'm all for burying the seed potatoes at the correct depth (based on soil conditions -- mine go down about 10 inches) -- it saves me the work of hilling up... seems like it saves the potato plant some work as well. The results are about about the same so why bother with all the extra work ?
16 Sep 23, Mpho Molefe (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
Question: Its my 1st time to embark on potatoe planting. What are the common diseases or challenges that may be encountered and how to combat them? The information is top class and straight forwsrd and simple to follow. Thanks a million times.
20 Sep 23, Anonymous (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
Just plant them and watch them grow.
Showing 11 - 20 of 818 comments

Ask a question or post a comment or advice about Potato

Please provide your email address if you are hoping for a reply


All comments are reviewed before displaying on the site, so your posting will not appear immediately

Gardenate App

Put Gardenate in your pocket. Get our app for iPhone, iPad or Android to add your own plants and record your plantings and harvests

Planting Reminders

Join 60,000+ gardeners who already use Gardenate and subscribe to the free Gardenate planting reminders email newsletter.


Home | Vegetables and herbs to plant | Climate zones | About Gardenate | Contact us | Privacy Policy

This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
We cannot help if you are overrun by giant slugs.