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Growing Marrow

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    S S P P            

(Best months for growing Marrow in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays P = Sow seed

  • Grow in seed trays, and plant out in 4-6 weeks. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 20°C and 35°C. (Show °F/in)
  • Space plants: 90 - 120 cm apart
  • Harvest in 12-17 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Peas, Beans, Onions, Sweetcorn
  • Avoid growing close to: Potatoes

Your comments and tips

31 Aug 18, Jane (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Mike, thanks for the reminder. I have read and occasionally reread the above.Invaluable. One of my marrow fruit turned yellow (had something at the flower end that looked like blossom-end rot that tomatoes can get) and came off while some of my leaves (Melbourne cream, Winter Squash Blue Hubbard) have small white spotty blotches on them . I cut them off and disposed of them in sealed zip bags but it's disappointing. Can I treat them? Thnx in advance.
22 Aug 18, Jane (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Anna,sadly I didn't get an answer from you. Never mind. I hope you sorted your marrow 'trellis'. I planted half a dozen out and notice there is fruit forming. Exciting for me as I haven't seen or eaten the old marrow since childhood. They are spreading out and starting to climb up the fence. Similarly, zucchini. Jane
06 Jun 18, Michelle (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Something is eating my marrow plant, can I lift it off the ground and tie it to a wire mesh fence? Thank you
02 Sep 18, Jane (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Michelle, this may or may not be relevant. When I saw the word 'wire' in your post, I thought to mention a small marrow about the size of a tennis ball that is growing on my vine. It began climbing up a temporary wire fence and I let it go as I didn't want to disturb it. Yesterday, I noticed that the said marrow and the top horizontal wire of the fence were firmly pressed up against one another. The little marrow seemed almost grafted on. I gently eased the marrow away from the fence but it kept gravitating back to the fence following the direction of the extended vine. I carefully inserted a piece of unused (synthetic type) flyscreen between the fence top and the marrow and then loosely draped the flyscreen along the top of the wire fence in hope that I can find a more permanent solution. Failing which - ? C'est la vie. I have seen images of wire trellis structures bent into arches etc and thought wire was a good idea. However, I am now thinking I could be wrong and that wire might work to do anything but ruin the fruit? Do you find wire works without an adverse effect? Enjoy yr marrow! J.
08 Jun 18, Mike L (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Yes be careful.
25 Nov 17, Anna (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Sadly, I didn't get any answers or help, however, I located old marrow seed and they are germinating. Pumpkins are mostly ready and big old squash are now half grown. Subtropical weather is not very kind to many fruits and vegies at this time of the year so I am finding but I am also discovering what does really well!
02 Jul 18, Jane (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
HI ann, Glad you found some marrow. I searched for years and finally, bi go! I planted some marrow seeds a couple if weeks and 3 have germinated.Exciting. Can't wait to plant them out and hope I get to share and eat them not least save their seeds. Yr so right, subtropical weather is a challenge. Here's to many better and more prosperous times in tbe garden How have your marrrow fared??
27 Nov 17, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Anna - The posts just on this page go back to 31 Dec 2014 and no posting by you, asking questions. I take it you are asking about marrow, squash and pumpkins. For these you need to know if you have frosts or not. For pumpkin I would grow into the winter (they mature slower and keep longer after picking). Probably all of these you could grow (plant seeds say March/April) into the winter or plant seeds August or when you feel frosts have finished and grow in spring. Yes the weather conditions you experience have a big impact on what you can plant. I live in Bundy and you maybe Sydney. You may have lots of frosts or none at all. Very high temps or lower than normal. Big down pours of rain or none at all. In Oct we had double the record - 245 mm (since 1946) of rainfall - 550 mms this year. Although I have a near full garden at the moment - I usually would have all my plants harvested by now - far too hot usually in summer - plants suffer so much in the middle of the day. I usually grow veggies from March to Oct - then rest the ground and add mulch etc during the summer. The ground needs a rest and so do I.
01 Nov 17, Elizabeth Fekete (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Where can I buy white marrow seed please
03 Nov 17, Mike (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Google seed selling companies.
Showing 11 - 20 of 53 comments

A marrow is NOT an over grown zucchini, they are members of the same genus, but different plants. I live in England, and use marrows a lot in August - December. I have a family member in Q L D, and visit every year. Would like to grow some while I'm there, but can not find any seeds!!

- Gill Blackford

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