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Growing Jerusalem Artichokes, also Sunchoke

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
      P                

(Best months for growing Jerusalem Artichokes in USA - Zone 5a regions)

P = Plant tubers

  • Easy to grow. Plant tubers about 5cm (1.5") deep.. Best planted at soil temperatures between 46°F and 59°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 12 - 18 inches apart
  • Harvest in 15-20 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Tomatoes, cucumbers

Your comments and tips

26 Apr 17, Giovanni (Australia - temperate climate)
You could 'raid' a few now if you wanted to. They would be riper when the plants start to die back for the winter. Even though they are just about indestructible it would be better to transplant them in the winter when they are dormant.
21 Apr 17, Alan (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
I planted Jerusalem Artichoke in February. It is now April and the plants look healthy but have only reached about 1 mtr in height. They reached this height quite quickly but have not moved for about 4 weeks. Is this natural? Thank you.
23 Apr 17, Jonno (Australia - temperate climate)
There could be a number of reasons including; a dry spell, cooler weather, planted late in the season, etc. but if your plants are healthy I don't think you need worry.
13 Apr 17, ROY HAUPT (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
Like most of the queries, where can one get JERUSALEM ARTICHOKES? I'm kinda old now but remember my father growing them in Pretoria in the 1950's the goggle eyed face you get when asking at a greengrocer or even a nursery tells all.
02 Jul 17, Mike (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
Last year I bought some from Lifestyle Garden Centre, Randpark Ridge ( corner of Ysterhout and Beyers Naude ). They grew very slowly, probably not in a sunny enough spot.
14 Apr 17, John (Australia - temperate climate)
seedsforafrica.co.za have them available. They are a friendly plant and you won't need to buy many as they multiply rapidly.
12 Mar 17, Garry Chellew (Australia - temperate climate)
Where can you purchase seed stock tubers
13 Mar 17, John (Australia - temperate climate)
Jerusalem artichoke tubers are usually available from nurseries, garden centres or hardware stores such as Bunnings in the winter, along with seed potatoes, garlic, etc. When you have got them growing you will have them forever, but that's not such a bad thing. All the best.
23 Feb 17, Sandy (Australia - temperate climate)
I planted my JA's last year (late) and didn't harvest them. This year thaey have gone mad. The article says 1.5m tall. Mine are 2.5mts+ with plenty of flowers. Looking forward to harvesting them I don't think I have ever eaten them before. Anyone have good preparation/cooking tips for them?
25 Feb 17, Ruth L. (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
Sandy, careful JA's are verye invasive, my husband calls them "*artyjokes" for obvious reasons.... my favourite is frying the peeled and thickly sliced roots in olive oil/butter with heaps of homegrown garlic cloves, add pepper and salt ....yummmo!! Jamie Oliver has a beef stew recipe that has JA's, its gorgeous, search for "Jools favourite beef stew or casserole online
Showing 11 - 20 of 156 comments

I planted a couple of JA's in spring and about 8 weeks ago they shot up with lovely yellow flowers. I cut these off fairly quickly hoping the growth would go back into the Tubers. I am guessing i could dig some up, but i would like to also move some of the tubers to another spot. Can i do this now or should i wait until the spring?

- Wendy

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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