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Growing Ginger

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Not recommended for growing in USA - Zone 5a regions

  • Plant pieces of fresh root showing signs of shoots. Best planted at soil temperatures between 68°F and 86°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 6 inches apart
  • Harvest in approximately 25 weeks. Reduce water as plant dies back to encourage rhizome growth.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Grow in separate bed

Your comments and tips

26 Jun 18, Meisie Helm (South Africa - Semi-arid climate)
Can I plant ginger in Bethlehem Freestate South Africa
12 Jun 18, Andrisa (South Africa - Semi-arid climate)
Where can I order zingiber officinale root in South Africa?
02 Jun 18, Soumya Chowdhury (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
We want to grow ginger in pot , what should be the ideal size of pot? How can we prepare the soil , what should be the mix and proportions of garden soil , compost and other manure ? What will be the best time ( months) to plant ginger in Canberra ? We will be happy to receive your valuable advice . Regards.
07 Jun 18, Mike L (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
It is a warm climate plant and you want to grow it in Canberra - cold.
01 May 18, hannah (Australia - temperate climate)
can you grow ginger in may sa
08 May 18, Joe Graham (Australia - temperate climate)
I have just pulled my first jinger plant that i grew in a large pot. it was my first attempt . While it was not a great success there is enough for me and will be enough also for the neighbours. also there are six little pieces that will grow on to be next years crop. I will let them dry a little and plant them when new shoots appear. plant in pot in full sun . cheers and good luck
02 May 18, Mike (Australia - temperate climate)
If you read the notes here there is no planting guide for temperate climate as Ginger is a warm weather crop. If you live in a warm temperate area it might be worth a go or as it says here grow in doors. Plant later in the year like sub tropical.
02 May 18, Hamsa (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
If you already have ginger roots, don’t buy them if you don’t have, put 1 root in each pot and put the pot under cover and keep watering, you have a higher chance of sprouting in spring
28 Apr 18, Anneliese (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
After digging ginger how do you store it until replanting and how long will it keep
22 Jul 18, Bernie (Australia - temperate climate)
I am just outside of Brisbane. I leave my ginger in an open area until the cut ends are well dried and then store them in a polystyrene box until I need them. I usually plant the new crop around mid to late October
Showing 11 - 20 of 229 comments

"Ginger is a warm climate plant. It can be grown indoors in cool/temperate areas. To grow well it needs lots of water and nutrients. Prepare the soil by adding compost which will retain some moisture but not get saturated. Add a small amount of sand to ensure drainage. Water regularly in summer to keep moist". I would suggest a raised bed - even just a bed that is higher than the surrounding area. Doesn't have to be a constructed bed. Put plenty of compost and sand as suggested. A sandy soil rather than a clay soil - a good loamy soil. The trick is to keep it moist but not have it wet all the time.

- Mike

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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