Growing Cape Gooseberry, also Golden Berry, Inca Berry

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    S   P              

(Best months for growing Cape Gooseberry in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays P = Sow seed

  • Easy to grow. Sow in garden. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 50°F and 77°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 39 - 59 inches apart
  • Harvest in 14-16 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Will happily grow in a flower border but tends to sprawl over other plants.

Your comments and tips

20 Oct 18, RobertC (USA - Zone 7a climate)
Florida are in zones 8 to 10. North of Florida is 8, south is 10. You can get around 70 seeds from a single fruit. Prepare 1cm of top soil, then space the seeds 1cm apart on top of the soil and cover with sprinkles of soil, just to cover the seeds. Water with mist and keep it moist. Plants will emerge in 3 to 7 days at 70F. I got 40 plants growing from one fruit's seeds in July 2018. The plant is a tropical grower. I kept 20 in a pot to take inside during winter and transplanted 20 around my house. I will have to transplant from the pot onto individual pots as they are crowding my starter pot. Good luck on your growing.
02 May 17, Elizabeth Medgyesy (USA - Zone 5a climate)
My two year old Cape Gooseberry plants have big strong shoots that have tiny plants along them. I'd like to cut them and transplant them to get more of this delicious berry. Any suggestions on how and where to cut the plant and then transplant the best way?
12 Aug 17, Helen (Canada - Zone 6b Temperate Warm Summer climate)
Plant's healthy, strong, shoots can be cut from the main stem and put in a water-filled bottle until white roots start to emerge. Once the roots are about one inch, the shoots can be planted in a rich soil to grow. It is advisable to change the bottle's water daily.
25 Feb 17, Dogmama (USA - Zone 5a climate)
Can golden berries be grown in Wisconsin?
26 Feb 17, John (Australia - temperate climate)
I am in southern Australia but my research tells me that you could grow them in 5a. you would need to get the seedlings started inside in trays or pots in April for transplanting outside in June. They need 3-4 months to harvest so would be harvestable in September. I trust your season is long enough for this. All the best.
31 Oct 16, elizabeth (USA - Zone 5a climate)
can you plant the seeds from the fruit?
29 Jun 19, S (USA - Zone 7a climate)
I brought some Uchuvas (the fruit of physalis peruviana) back from Colombia this past January. Maybe 10. I just put them barely under some soil in a pot. took me a little bit to sort out that they liked the sun but not direct, so I found a shaded area along the house and watered everyday. have a pretty good sized bush now, with a consistent roll of flowers, the first waves of which are now uchuvas growing in their lanterns.
29 Mar 16, Paula Kreger (USA - Zone 3a climate)
Can I grow the Cape Gooseberries in my zone?---zone 3.
28 Mar 16, Richard de Losada (USA - Zone 5a climate)
I have a question if these can grow in an exotic greenhouse !!! please send me any info that you might have !!! Thanks for your time..
26 Mar 16, Jeanne (USA - Zone 4b climate)
Could the golden berry be planted in containers?
Showing 11 - 20 of 34 comments

Have a look at this page www.gardenate.com/plant/Cape Gooseberry?zone=14

- Liz

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