Growing Artichokes (Globe)

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
  S   P                

(Best months for growing Artichokes (Globe) in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays P = Sow seed

  • Easy to grow. Sow in garden. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 15°C and 18°C. (Show °F/in)
  • Space plants: 160 - 200 cm apart
  • Harvest in 42-57 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Needs a lot of space. Best in separate bed

Your comments and tips

14 Dec 20, (USA - Zone 3a climate)
If leaves are rich green colour then they have enough fert, if yellow then apply some general fert. Mulch with anything, have it loose so water can go through it. Only put it on about50-70mm thick.
24 Nov 20, Jack McLeod (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
I live in Salem, just outside Grahamstown, summer rainfall and cold winters. Could I grow artichokes.
25 Nov 20, (South Africa - Summer rainfall climate)
Check the monthly planting calendar for SA Summer Rainfall climate zone.
28 Oct 20, Karen Jean (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Can I grow artichoke seed green globe & Purple of Romagna in a plant pot? I have a 14” pot or should I go larger? How many seeds should I plant in one?
28 Oct 20, Anonymous (USA - Zone 10b climate)
Plant Spacing- 160-200cm, 5-7 feet. That is between each plant.
03 Jun 20, Kobus Smal (South Africa - Semi-arid climate)
Will it possible to grow artischokes at the western cape coastline with winter rain falls.
03 Jun 20, Anonymous (South Africa - Dry summer sub-tropical climate)
Work out your climate zone from the description here in the BLUE TAB - CLIMATE ZONES. Looks to me you might be Dry summer sub-tropical. Then check the planting time in the monthly calendar guide.
05 May 20, Rossana Parker (Canada - Zone 6b Temperate Warm Summer climate)
Another question. Can I grow globe artichokes in a big pot and again, does it need full sun? Thank you.
12 May 21, Celeste Archer (Canada - Zone 7a Mild Temperate climate)
Artichokes are considered very deep rooted - with their tap root extending beyond 36" and generally running around 5' deep. Artichokes tend to be used to quickly (3-4 months) hold soil erosion at the side of a hill - just toss the seeds - this can be done as a temporary measure until perennials take hold or other measures are taken. My point is; they are really meant for areas where their tap roots can run deep. Mind you, I know a lot of veggies that people grow in containers that are really not suited to containers. If you tried to grow the artichoke in a container, expect stunted growth..... somehow it just seems cruel. Try searching the web for "vegetable root depth chart" -- and look at the vegetables that have shallow roots; they are most likely going to be the vegetables that do best in containers. Also in the medium rooted vegetables SOMETIMES their is a variety that is suitable for containers - for example TomatoFest (online seeds) has a project called "The Dwarf Tomato Project" where they have chosen tomatoes specifically for containers. If your buying seeds - most will tell you if they are suitable for containers.
26 Nov 19, Grace Walker (USA - Zone 7a climate)
Hello, I am new to this. I would like to experiment with planting artichokes. I do not know what kind of soil I have...and how to make it friendly for this vegetable. Do you have suggestion? Do you know of a great online resources on this? Thanks!
Showing 11 - 20 of 106 comments

Can I grow artichoke seed green globe & Purple of Romagna in a plant pot? I have a 14” pot or should I go larger? How many seeds should I plant in one?

- Karen Jean

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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