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Growing Eggplant, also Aubergine

(Solanum sp.)

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
  S S   P              

(Best months for planting Eggplant in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays. P = Plant direct in garden where they are to grow.


  • Grow in seed trays, and plant out in 4-6 weeks. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 75°F and 90°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 24 - 30 inches apart
  • Harvest in 12-15 weeks. Cut fruit with scissors or sharp knife.
  • Compatible with (can grow in same bed): Beans, capsicum, lettuce, amaranth, thyme
  • Avoid growing in same bed: Potatoes
  • A seedling
  • Eggplant

Your comments and tips

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13 Apr 13, Esantoso (Australia - tropical climate)
I think it is either they are too old, egg plant is better when they are young. Or fungi disease which cause the fruit to go rotten. Both cases fruit is no longer edible.
30 Mar 13, chris (Australia - temperate climate)
no mater how much we try we always get a worm in our fruit we have sprayed with lebsyd have put lime in the soil we change the patch around do you know what type of worm it is and how to control it
28 Mar 13, Rosa (Australia - temperate climate)
Some of my eggplants have started off purple but are now starting to turn yellow. Can someone tell me what is causing this and are they still ok to eat? Thanks
24 Mar 13, kemal (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
once it stops fruiting do I pull out the plant or do i keep it growing for next Year??
01 Sep 13, indy (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
I just saw your comment today s you've probably made your decision! However, given your climate and that eggplants are perennials in semi-tropical areas, you should get a few years of fruit if you look after your plants
18 Mar 14, Mary H.R. (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Hello! I'm growing eggplants in Western Australia. I live in the Hills above Perth - but it has been an extraordinarily hot dry summer. I've watered my aubergines most days since January. But the plants are quite small - less than 1/2 a metre. We have had round fruit about tennis ball size. I have some good horse poo from a neighbour, and some compost I made myself in one of those black plastic compost boxes. It's pretty good stuff! Any advice would be most welcome. Mary
13 Mar 13, maguerite (South Africa - Dry summer sub-tropical climate)
my eggplants are flowering however no fruit are forming. what could be wrong?
11 Mar 13, Lisa (Australia - temperate climate)
My eggplants have been growing strong for a while. The latest batch I have have all been drilled into by some bug/worm thing. There are tiny holes in the fruit and when I cut one open there is brown larvae in there. Any ideas? Also can the plants be left for next season or is it best to rip them up and plant new ones?
11 Feb 13, Elaine (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
My Eggplants are growing good. Keeping my eye some pests and squishing them. But the fruit seems to have a strange growth effect on them. The bases seem to be a green colour and the fruit seems to have like growth spurt makes on them. Can you please tell me why this is happening and what I can do to stop the marks occurring?
09 Feb 13, jeff (Australia - temperate climate)
what is the best way to stop slatters eating my rockmelons an watermelons .would love some advice

Post a question, comment or tip about Eggplant

Please help.My eggplants are growing tall and look healthy.No flowers.What can I use to promote fruit?I have fertilized with blue MPK and blood and bone

- Marlene


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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.

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