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Growing Celery

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
  S S   T T            

(Best months for growing Celery in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays T = Plant out (transplant) seedlings

  • Grow in seed trays, and plant out in 4-6 weeks. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 54°F and 70°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 6 - 12 inches apart
  • Harvest in 17-18 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Not applicable as celery needs to be close together to encourage blanching.
  • Avoid growing close to: Sweetcorn
  • Celery seedlings
    Celery seedlings

Most varieties improve with blanching but there are some self-blanching varieties available. To Blanch: plant in trenches 15- 20 cm (6-8 in) deep and 20cm (8in) apart. Leave about 40 cm (17 in) between rows. Fill the trenches gradually and keep well watered as the plants grow. The plants can be lifted as needed after about 11 weeks. Alternatively wrap the plants in sleeves of paper or black plastic.

Celery needs moist fertile soil.

Culinary hints - cooking and eating Celery

Chop and use raw in salad or braised in hot dishes.

Your comments and tips

05 Oct 17, Daniel (Australia - temperate climate)
thanks
22 Aug 17, Eileen Stowers (New Zealand - temperate climate)
Just a query. How is celery grown in NZ. ? When we lived in UK (many years ago) we used to dig a trench and when the celery was showing above the ground it was wrapped in news paper up to the leaves and then increased as the plant grew. This meant that most of the stalks were white and crisp but we find that the NZ celery is stringy and dark green on the outside . Is this to do with the climate or method of cultivating ? Also my father used to empty the soot from the chimney round the plants at a short distance away from the roots. (I know this would not be an option here ) !!!! but maybe there is an alternative.
19 May 17, David (New Zealand - temperate climate)
My celery is growing quite well in Auckland but is getting this brown fungal problem (I think) - the leaves wither and the stems go brown . Is there any safe spray,etc to use? Thanks David
22 May 17, John (Australia - temperate climate)
It sounds like a fungal disease. Celery prefers foll sun and good drainage with good air circulation. Fungal problems are exacerbated in wet soils, high humidity and poor airflow. The fungal spores are soil-born so I suggest you try a new bed with good drainage. A lot of rain and high humidity will make this problem worse. Trust this helps.
02 May 17, peter andrews (New Zealand - sub-tropical climate)
being on a pension now,i have taken a big interest in growing vegies,so I invested in a glass house ,I already have beetroot plants growing, very good ,also I have silver beet growing very good ex in fact .also I have broccoli growing good ,cabbage good ,and cauliflour now shooting up ,can I grow capsicums now ,?,,,,,,,and can I grow celery now,,?,,,,,,and can I grow chillie peppers now ?,,,,, its a great way to keep your mind going and its so nice when you see all the plants starting to get healthy and start growing .hope I am doing ok ? I will welcome any advice you can give me to help me master this art of growing ,kind regards peter
10 May 17, Mem (New Zealand - temperate climate)
Hi you wont be able to grow chillies or capicums until mid spring-early summer,you can grow celery,broccoli,cauliflower,leeks,cabbage,spinach,silverbeet and peas without cover through winter provided you're in an area without frequent hard frosts and lettuce,radishes and beetroot etc in the glasshouse.
03 May 17, John (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
In your area you would normally sow seed in march and April in your glass house ready for transplanting in May and June. You could also sow seed in August and September for October and November planting out. To avoid stringiness in your celery keep the water up to the plants. Well manured or composted soil will also help.
17 Apr 17, Yvette (New Zealand - cool/mountain climate)
My celery has been the biggest hit in my garden all Summer here in Taumarunui. Its starting to look past its best, rip it out now or wait for the frost to get it and continue to use it until then? I was under the impression you could sow celery for winter, this is obviously wrong and I should now wait till spring? :}
15 Apr 17, Bob Bradley (New Zealand - temperate climate)
What diseases affect celery and what steps can one take to avoid attacks.
15 Apr 17, (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Celery is susceptible to various fungal diseases which cause the stems to go brown and rot so keep the beds weeded to allow good air circulation. Fungal problems can also be caused by overhead watering and heavy rain. You can't control the rain but ensure celery is planted in an open, sunny spot with good airflow, Good soil and balance in your garden planting to provide food sources for beneficial insects such as ladybirds, hover fly and damsel flies will control aphids, etc that turn up. Any 'daisy' type flowers are good beneficial host plants
Showing 1 - 10 of 53 comments

T.his years celery was too large, and not as tender.I looked but could not find the light color I like.

- Wilma Brown

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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