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Growing Capsicum, also Bell peppers, Sweet peppers

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
  S S P P              

(Best months for growing Capsicum in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays P = Sow seed

  • Grow in seed trays, and plant out in 4-6 weeks. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 64°F and 95°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 8 - 20 inches apart
  • Harvest in 10-12 weeks. Cut fruit off with sharp knife.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Egg plant (Aubergine), Nasturtiums, Basil, Parsley, Amaranth

Your comments and tips

18 Apr 08, Bruce (Unknown climate)
capsicum plants are producing some capsicum not a lot and the leaves are a become somewhat wilted as they grow the plants are in a large pot with good quality soil mix with good drainage any ideas how to improve the numbers is vegies or health of the plants.
04 Jul 08, chris (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
my caps, are all getting a tiny pin hole in them, and there is silk inside. would fine mesh restrict the sunlight
03 Aug 08, Rebecca (Australia - temperate climate)
My capcicums seem to be finished, all the leaves have wilted although they still have friut not fully grown...My question is. Do they have a life expenditure...Have mine just finished or do they need me to do somethoing...I have others that are still growing and looking healthy. They are different veriety..Please help....I hate to see them wilting..
03 Aug 08, Rebecca (Australia - temperate climate)
My capcicums seem to be finished, all the leaves have wilted although they still have friut not fully grown...My question is. Do they have a life expenditure...Have mine just finished or do they need me to do somethoing...I have others that are still growing and looking healthy. They are different veriety..Please help....I hate to see them wilting..
03 Aug 08, Liz (New Zealand - temperate climate)
Rebecca, in a temperate zone you can only expect capsicums to be annuals. Remove the plants as they die down and grow new ones for next summer.
06 Aug 08, laura (Australia - tropical climate)
We live on acreage in Far North QLD.Had the idea of growing caps and chillis but were informed it is too wet and we don't have enough sun.Is this true or is there a way around this?
07 Aug 08, Mary Ann Derequito (Australia - tropical climate)
I have grown capsicums as big as footballs using crocodile manure as a fertilizer. They bear from August to January. I have a special soil mix which I am prepared to share with anyone who is interested.
26 Aug 08, diane (Australia - temperate climate)
I live in melbourne msth west area and was wondering if i would be able to grow capsicums here ??
16 Apr 11, Katelyn (Australia - tropical climate)
This will be the 7th year of Capsicum farming on the same property although this year we’ve had some trouble with weather conditions. We had approximately 21 inches of rain recently which has stunted the growth of the plants and fruit. Although my question refers to why some of the plants have recovered better than others when they are in the same soil exposed to the same conditions, water and chemicals. Yet the difference from one row to the next, a mere three feet apart is very clear that some have more resistance than others, what can cause this and how can I improve the overall recovery?
02 Dec 12, sean (Australia - tropical climate)
indeed you can grow capsicum melb way diane im geelong way we have simalar weather i have had no trouble my friend ive had a plant last me 5 years every year more fruit green capsicum may have lived longer its life was cut short due to children breaking limbs.
Showing 11 - 20 of 403 comments

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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