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Growing Cape Gooseberry, also Golden Berry, Inca Berry

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
    S   P              

(Best months for growing Cape Gooseberry in USA - Zone 5a regions)

S = Plant undercover in seed trays P = Sow seed

  • Easy to grow. Sow in garden. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 50°F and 77°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 20 inches apart
  • Harvest in 14-16 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Will happily grow in a flower border

Your comments and tips

01 Jun 11, geoffrey (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
i would like to try and grow some do you have address where we can contact supplier or post seed po box 243 gayndah qld 4625 thanks in advance and we will reinbust you
02 Feb 11, Andrew (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Is there anyone in the Gladstone, QLD region who has seedlings that I could purchase? Thanks, Andrew
23 Feb 11, Ken (Australia - tropical climate)
Hi Andrew, If your interested in some seeds, I've got some here in Rocky. Send a self addressed envelope to KjW 375 East St R'ton and I'll send you a dozen or so. Rgards KjW
23 Feb 11, Shayne (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Hi can anyone tell me if I can buy these seeds from any shops in the Brisbane - preferably south Brisbane? Thanks Shayne
24 Feb 11, Ken (Australia - tropical climate)
Hi Shayne, Do a search for Eden Seeds, Their at Lower Beechmont Cheers
06 Jun 11, Selwyn (Sel.) Hodgson (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Are goosberries best grown with a "stake" support or is there a special "trellis" to keep them up off the ground? They are very straggely and fruit gets missed in the undergrowth. HELP! Regards Sel. Hodgson
07 Jun 11, (Australia - arid climate)
I've never staked them, but I suppose tying up the stems might help like staking tomatoes to keep the fruit off the ground. You could try putting wire mesh around the plants so the stems grow through the mesh for support.
10 Jul 11, (Australia - cool/mountain climate)
I have just bought a gooseberry bush from Bunnings, Tweed, Burleigh and Nerang all have them at only $10 so Im sure Brisbane Bunnings will stock them.
09 Aug 11, Bel (Australia - temperate climate)
Cape Gooseberry is an entirely different species to the Gooseberry bush you bought at bunnings. Cape Gooseberries taste like tiny cherry tomatoes and are from the tomatillo family, where as gooseberries are from similar hedgerow families to blackberries. The bush you bought will produce very sweet, tart berries, but the cape gooseberry is quite different- and nice! Grab some cape gooseberry seeds from ebay, sprinkle a packet over your garden & go nuts!
27 Oct 11, Bill (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Quite right - it just shows the importance of scientific species names rather than only relying in unspecific English names. The European gooseberry is Ribes uva-ursi and closely related to black currants (Ribes nigra). However it seems to be difficult to differentiate these two totally different plants even at the nursery that produces them, as the Physalis peruvianas sold at Bunnings some time ago had the correct information about the plant, but a picture of R. uva-ursi...
Showing 11 - 20 of 341 comments

Plant's healthy, strong, shoots can be cut from the main stem and put in a water-filled bottle until white roots start to emerge. Once the roots are about one inch, the shoots can be planted in a rich soil to grow. It is advisable to change the bottle's water daily.

- Helen

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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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