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Growing Amaranth, also Love-lies-bleeding

Jan F M A M J J A S O N Dec
                       

Not recommended for growing in USA - Zone 5a regions

  • Sow in garden. Sow seed at a depth approximately three times the diameter of the seed. Best planted at soil temperatures between 64°F and 86°F. (Show °C/cm)
  • Space plants: 20 inches apart
  • Harvest in 7-8 weeks.
  • Compatible with (can grow beside): Onions, corn, peppers, egg plant, tomatoes

Your comments and tips

13 Apr 11, Diana~Adelaide (Australia - temperate climate)
You will see that the seeds on the flower turn black which means that it is ready to harvest. Or you can shake the flower while holding a container and the mature seeds will drop.
14 Mar 11, Amanda (Australia - temperate climate)
When should I harvest amaranth seeds? And what do I do with them if I want to use them? Anyone?
27 May 11, (Australia - temperate climate)
Hi Amanda, we use it like we cook our green with a litte oil onions mustard and tomatoes. You can also add some vegetable masala (you get them in the indian or asian grocery) and then add salt to taste. Its a healthy veg.
03 Mar 11, JP (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Amaranth is known in South Africa as 'Marogo' and considered somewhat of a delicacy by the indigenous people, to the extent that it has become scarce in most areas. It readily sows itself, especially when eaten by cattle it grows very strongly from the manure. I recommend growing it in compost, and harvesting while young and tender.
07 May 13, PF (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Marogo is a generic term given to all leafy plants that can be cooked like spinach.
16 Feb 11, Adrian (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
you don't NEED seed raising mix (if fact you don't NEED it for almost anything). Buying stuff like that is completely unnecessary. Just plant in reasonably fine, moist soil, even just scatter it over the top after raking and water. THe seeds are fine but should germinate really well.. we are currently weeding all of the excess amaranth.
30 Jan 11, Bronwyn ( Australia0 (Australia - temperate climate)
I have these coming up each year about December and they flower right thru to first or second frost..they grow up to 3 metres high in my area and are absolutely stunning and they self seed each year in December...but beware they self seed every year ....grow in pots or any sort of soil and just keep on coming.
18 Jan 11, star7 (Australia - sub-tropical climate)
Amaranth stems, young, steamed for a few minutes are delicious, succulent and have an unusual flavour - they smell like sweet earth when cooked - definitely worth growing,
05 Jan 11, Liz (Australia - temperate climate)
This is a message for Mike who wants to change his zone - you didn't include yr email address - Scroll to the end of your reminder email and click on the change details tab - You can change zone there.
10 Nov 10, David (Australia - temperate climate)
I was having problems locating the seeds in Perth. Bunnings did not have them and my local Waldecks had never heard of Amaranth. I finally managed to buy them on ebay. The seller has a website - australianseed.com Does anyone have any tips on how to get seeds to germinate successfully?
Showing 31 - 40 of 59 comments

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