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Showing 31 - 60 of 254 comments
Basil 30 Jul, Paul (USA - Zone 8b climate)
Sounds like Downey Mildew. Undersides have grey black fuzz spores, the plant looks like has a nutritional problem. Suggest sanitation, regular application of organic teas and bio fungicides to populate the leaves with bacteria and fungi so the mildew can't get a start.... Varieties with flatter leaves vs. cupped tend to have an easier time.
Basil 28 Apr, John (Australia - temperate climate)
Basil is normally easy to grow. Normally you would plant it in your area from April to July.It doesn't like frost but, as it is a soft herb it doesn't like extreme heat and drying winds either. Try planting it where it gets morning sun and is protected from harsh conditions. A spot that gets light shade would also be good. Basil likes fertile, well drained soil and will reward you if the water supply is evenly damp but not wet. Sowing seed directly where it is going to grow is the best as direct-seeded plants will always do better than transplants. Trust this helps.
Basil 25 Apr, Monique (USA - Zone 5a climate)
I live in Florida around Daytona beach and can't grow basil to save my life. I've tried it in pots inside and outside. This year O planted it by my tomatoes and it still died. I'm I watering it to much too much sunny it said full sun but it looks like it's getting brunt... HELP !!
Basil 30 Apr, John (Australia - temperate climate)
Basil is normally easy to grow. it likes moist, fertile soil and, while it won't tolerate frosts, it will burn with heat or drying winds. Select a spot that gets morning sun and protection later in the day then sow seed thinly in this spot. Sowing seed direct is more successful than using a seed bed or pot then transplanting as the plants aren't subject to root disturbance and transplanting shock.
Asparagus 22 Apr, Joy (New Zealand - cool/mountain climate)
Can you tell the difference between male and female asparagus, and what is the difference?
Asparagus 23 Apr, Jack (USA - Zone 6b climate)
When the tops are allowed to develop into the feathery stage the female plants will have the berries which turn red when ripe.
Rutabaga (also Swedes) 21 Apr, Brian Hargiss (USA - Zone 7a climate)
Where and when is the best place to plant rutabagas in northwest Arkansas? Thank you very much
Rutabaga (also Swedes) 22 Apr, John (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Rutabagas can be planted now. they are a cabbage/turnip cross and will do well where cabbages do well. Old manure worked into the soil and even watering will reduce the chance of checks in their growth. Along with their common uses they are great cooked and mashed or finely diced, cooked and mixed with creamed corn.
Rhubarb 21 Apr, Brian hargiss (USA - Zone 7a climate)
How well can I grow rhubarb in North West Arkansas ? Thank You
Rhubarb 25 Apr, John (Australia - temperate climate)
You should be able to grow rhubarb in NW Arkansas. Plants are normally available in the winter from nurseries. Burpee's also list them. If your winter is severe put a good layer of straw over them to help insulate them.
Sweet Potato (also Kumara) 24 Mar, Bob (USA - Zone 9b climate)
Trying to find some Evangeline sweet potato slips. I've only been able to find commercial quantities. Any help appreciated
Sweet Potato (also Kumara) 24 Mar, John (Australia - temperate climate)
'Evangeline' was developed at a horticultural research institute in Louisiana and has Intellectual Property Rights. This means that it could only be available to commercial growers who probably pay a royalty for the slips for their crops. You could try the Sweet Potato Research Station at: PO Box 120, Chase LA 71324. These restrictions seem onerous for home gardeners but help pay for the development costs for new varieties. Try them, they may be willing to send you a few slips.
Cape Gooseberry (also Golden Berry, Inca Berry ) 25 Feb, Dogmama (USA - Zone 5a climate)
Can golden berries be grown in Wisconsin?
Cape Gooseberry (also Golden Berry, Inca Berry ) 26 Feb, John (Australia - temperate climate)
I am in southern Australia but my research tells me that you could grow them in 5a. you would need to get the seedlings started inside in trays or pots in April for transplanting outside in June. They need 3-4 months to harvest so would be harvestable in September. I trust your season is long enough for this. All the best.
Turnip 01 Feb, Billy Pressley (USA - Zone 8a climate)
What is the best soil to grow turnips
Turnip 04 Feb, John (Australia - temperate climate)
I am in temperate Australia which could be roughly transposed to your Zone 8. We can sow turnips from Spring until early Summer (about 8 months). Have you considered Swedes (rutabaga) which are a turnip/cabbage cross and are very flavorsome. Trust this helps.
Beans - climbing (also Pole beans, Runner beans, Scarlet Runners) 03 Dec, Paul A'Barge (USA - Zone 8b climate)
I have had zero luck with climbing beans in zone 8B. I buy the seeds from a local greenhouse/starter and plant - diddly comes up. Next year I am going to start seeds in starter pots and I will transplant those that show up and are healthy. I think the seller of the seeds does not want to bother starting seeds and so keeps old seed around to sell to people who want climbing beans, aka rip off.
Cape Gooseberry (also Golden Berry, Inca Berry ) 31 Oct, elizabeth (USA - Zone 5a climate)
can you plant the seeds from the fruit?
Jerusalem Artichokes (also Sunchoke) 29 Oct, marie (USA - Zone 11b climate)
Does anyone have any knowledge of Jerusalem artichokes sunchokes growing in Hawaii?
Zucchini (also Courgette/Marrow, Summer squash) 26 Oct, bob (USA - Zone 7b climate)
where can i buy zepher squash
Beans - broad beans, fava beans (also Fava bean) 15 Oct, Roland Close (USA - Zone 9b climate)
I am growing Fava beans for the first time I'm my home garden. My friends in England are assisting me with emails and YouTube videos on the proper way to sow, grow, and harvest them.
Ginger 23 Sep, Le nguyen (USA - Zone 5a climate)
Where I can buy the ginger plant so I can grow it under ground? I live in CA
Ginger 01 Feb, Eric Ackley (USA - Zone 9a climate)
In the past, I have bought ginger at the grocery store. Plant several, and dig the root up when you want to use it, cut off a portion, and replant the rest. This year, i will plant more, as we only planted 1 ginger, and it got used up pretty quickly.
Strawberry Plants 18 Sep, Sharron Berry (USA - Zone 5b climate)
How do I winter Strawberries in ZONE 5b we have a very short growing season and are at 9000 feet. We tend to get a perma frost
Strawberry Plants 18 Sep, Liz (New Zealand - temperate climate)
Sharron, you can lift your plants and save the runners with roots started. If no runners then just use the plants. Wrap them in sacking and keep dry and out of the frost until you are ready to plant them. Then water well and plant as usual. They will take a little while to get started, starting them inside in pots might help.
Ginger 03 Sep, Richard Devries (USA - Zone 6b climate)
Can I grow ginger indoors ? How big does pot have to be ?
Ginger 27 Aug, Kev (USA - Zone 5a climate)
Can Ginger be grown in California?
Collards (also Collard greens, Borekale) 18 Aug, Triciia (Australia - temperate climate)
I love my smoothies and have started to build a raised garden please can you tell me what greens do well together and when... Thank you in advance. Kind regards, Triciia
Beans - broad beans, fava beans (also Fava bean) 17 Jul, Elio Sonsini (USA - Zone 5a climate)
I buy lots of fava beans in a store of Southbridge MA I was wondering where they come from I make excellent dishes with fava beans, pasta with fava beans, fava beans with cicoria or just boil them
Potato 14 Jul, Selma (USA - Zone 10b climate)
Is it to late In the season to start potatoes in zone 10b?
Showing 31 - 60 of 254 comments
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This planting guide is a general reference intended for home gardeners. We recommend that you take into account your local conditions in making planting decisions. Gardenate is not a farming or commercial advisory service. For specific advice, please contact your local plant suppliers, gardening groups, or agricultural department. The information on this site is presented in good faith, but we take no responsibility as to the accuracy of the information provided.
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